Revision history for ProjectProposalMOOCVersion


Revision [10206]

Last edited on 2011-03-17 06:15:11 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
====Some Examples====
http://jmanassa.wordpress.com/category/class-project/


Revision [10163]

Edited on 2011-03-13 10:01:32 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be weekly materials to engage (read, view, look at, annotate). And we'll continue to meet on Tuesdays. We'll have a weekly exercise to work with in class. But if you are running a project, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project rather than the required activity.
For your project, you will need to show weekly progress, and tag your aggregations, annotations, and repurposings with en3177 to submit them - just as you have been doing.
Deletions:
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be required weekly materials to engage (read, view, look at) and annotate, but rather than pursuing the weekly required activity, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project.
We'll continue to meet on Tuesdays.
You will need to show weekly progress, and tag your aggregations, annotations, and repurposings with en3177 to submit them - just as you have done.


Revision [10162]

Edited on 2011-03-13 09:57:10 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- What you're going to look into. What you look into needs to connect with weblogs, wikis, social media ... or any of the topics we've looked at so far: produsage, publishing, marketing, freelancing ... There are hundreds of possible connections, but you need to state the connect you're going to pursue.
- How are you going to investigate this? By what means or methods, and drawing on what sources? You will need to do some preliminary searching for this: materials to look at, people to talk to, links to make, activities to pursue, artifacts to create... **You need to show weekly progress by way of aggregating, annotating, or repurposing**. So work those requirements into your plan.
- What will you produce as an artifact or set of artifacts? This could be a final repurposing, or a series or set of artifacts that you produce along the way, or both.
Deletions:
- What you're going to look into. What you look into needs to connect with weblogs, wikis, social media ... or any of the topics we've looked at so far: produsage, ... There are hundreds of possible connections, but you need to make the connect.
- How are you going to investigate this? By what means or methods, and drawing on what sources? You will need to do some preliminary searching for this: materials to look at, people to talk to, links to make, activities to pursue, artifacts to create... You need to show weekly progress by way of aggregating, annotating, or repurposing, work those requirements into your plan.
- What will you produce as an artifact or set of artifacts? This could be a final repurposing, or a series or set of artifacts that you produce along the way.


Revision [10145]

Edited on 2011-03-13 08:45:57 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be required weekly materials to engage (read, view, look at) and annotate, but rather than pursuing the weekly required activity, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project.
We'll continue to meet on Tuesdays.
Deletions:
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be required weekly materials to engage (read, view, look at) and discuss, and we will still meet on Tuesdays, but rather than pursuing the weekly required activity, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project.


Revision [10144]

Edited on 2011-03-13 08:44:43 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be required weekly materials to engage (read, view, look at) and discuss, and we will still meet on Tuesdays, but rather than pursuing the weekly required activity, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project.
Deletions:
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be weekly materials to engage (read, view, look at), but rather than following the required activity beyond reading and responding, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project.


Revision [10143]

Edited on 2011-03-13 08:41:14 by MorganAdmin

No Differences

Revision [10142]

Edited on 2011-03-13 08:17:06 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- 500 pts (about a C) for a general, non-topic-specific project. Reading, linking, and annotating 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 - 750 words each post.
Deletions:
- 500 pts (about a C) for a general, non-topic-specific project. Reading, linking, and annotating 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 - 750 words each post.


Revision [10136]

Edited on 2011-03-13 07:31:58 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- For what grade are you contracting? For this, detail your project //in measurable terms//: numbers. Think in terms of numbers of annotations, aggregations, and repurposings. Specify lengths and frequency of posting. Use good estimations here because you'll be held to them. Showing weekly progress by way of aggregating, annotating, or repurposing is expected. Here are some guidelines on setting the contract.
Deletions:
- For what grade are you contracting? For this, detail your project //in measurable terms//: numbers. Think in terms of numbers of annotations, aggregations, and repurposings. Specify lengths and frequency of posting. Use good estimations here because you'll be held to them. Showing weekly progress by way of aggregating, annotating, or repurposing is expected. You're interested in the numbers here. Here are some guidelines on setting the contract


Revision [10135]

Edited on 2011-03-13 07:30:53 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
You will need to show weekly progress, and tag your aggregations, annotations, and repurposings with en3177 to submit them - just as you have done.
Deletions:
You will need to show weekly progress, and tag your aggregations, annotations, and repurposings with en3177 to submit them,


Revision [10134]

Edited on 2011-03-13 07:30:17 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
To start a project, post a plan on the wiki, or your own wiki or blog. If you do it on the wiki, go to your WikiName page, create a new page titled ProjectProposalYourWikiName. Tag your proposal with EN3177.
Deletions:
To start a project, post a plan on the wiki, or your own wiki or blog. Go to your WikiName page, create a new page titled ProjectProposalYourWikiName. Tag your proposal with EN3177.


Revision [10133]

Edited on 2011-03-13 07:29:43 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
Hand in a print version for my feedback and ok.
Deletions:
Hand in a print version for my feedback and ok. Your project has to be approved by me before I will count it in your grade.


Revision [10126]

Edited on 2011-03-12 16:13:52 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
To start a project, post a plan on the wiki, or your own wiki or blog. Go to your WikiName page, create a new page titled ProjectProposalYourWikiName. Tag your proposal with EN3177.
- Contracts are set for the number of points: 500 / 750 / 1000.
Hand in a print version for my feedback and ok. Your project has to be approved by me before I will count it in your grade.
Deletions:
To start a project, post a plan on the wiki (or your own wiki or blog). Go to your WikiName page, create a new page titled ProjectProposalYourWikiName. Tag your proposal with EN3177. And hand in a print version for my feedback and ok. Ok?
Contracts are set for the number of points: 500 / 750 / 1000.
Your project has to be approved by me before it will be counted in your grade.
Use good estimations because you'll be held to them.
You can earn more points than you contract for if you end up going beyond what you originally planned on. On the other hand, if you fall short on the contract, you may receive fewer points. (I'm hoping for the former.)
=== Calendar ===
State specifically as possible where you will be at check in times below. Again, think in terms of numbers and frequency and state explicitly what you plan to have by each point.

- Monday, Mar 29. About 3 weeks into the project. We'll meet face to face on this Monday to touch base. What will you have accomplished by this point? (Point of Abandonment. If the project isn't going well, this is the last point to re-think it.)
- Monday, 19 April. Seven weeks in. We will meet face to face 19 April, 21 April, and possibly Mon, 28 April to compare notes and talk about preparing write ups. What will you have by this point? What will be left to be done by the end of the project?
- Finals day. Short informal presentations.
During the week of April 5 - 9, you'll be taking studio tours of the projects of others. The assignment will be posted.
We'll meet on finals day. Reports are due by Weds, May 5th, 2010.
==== some examples ====
These are all very good project proposal (clearly planned and stated) which resulted in 1000 point projects.
- [[ProjectProposalJennBeyer Jenn Beyer]]
- [[ProjectProposalMalloryMeredith Mallory Meredith]]
- [[ProjectProposalChristopherMiles Christopher Miles]]
There are other projects to look at in the archives at PastParticipants.
See also BlogSites for examples | ExampleWikis and WikiAsCulture for examples | CourseSyllabus


Revision [10125]

Edited on 2011-03-12 16:10:58 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- 500 pts (about a C) for a general, non-topic-specific project. Reading, linking, and annotating 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 - 750 words each post.
- 750 pts (B) for a focused project, including reading, linking, and annotating, creating weekly artifacts, searching for subjects to discuss (not simply comment on but consider and delve into), 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 - 750 words or so. Can include artifacts outside of exposition: mind-maps, timelines, etc.
- 1000 pts (A) for a focused, extensive project. Searching, reading, linking, and annotating, creating weekly artifacts pushing 500 - 750 - 1000 words or videos or podcasts, experiments...
Deletions:
- 500 pts (about a C) for a general, non-topic-specific project. Reading, linking, and annotating 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 - 750 words each post.
- 750 pts (B) for a focused project, including reading, linking, and annotating, creating weekly artifacts, searching for subjects to discuss (not simply comment on but consider and delve into), 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 - 750 words or so. Can include artifacts outside of exposition: mind-maps, timelines, etc.
- 1000 pts (A) for a focused, extensive project. Searching, reading, linking, and annotating, creating weekly artifacts pushing 500 - 750 - 1000 words or videos or podcasts, experiments...


Revision [10124]

Edited on 2011-03-12 16:10:06 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- 1000 pts (A) for a focused, extensive project. Searching, reading, linking, and annotating, creating weekly artifacts pushing 500 - 750 - 1000 words or videos or podcasts, experiments...
Deletions:
- 1000 pts (A) for a focused, extensive prctoje. Searching, reading, linking, and annotating, creating weekly artifacts, searching t some entries becoming 500 - 750 - 1000 word essays... For a wiki, focused, well-linked, but more developed, more richly linked, more organized than the B.


Revision [10123]

Edited on 2011-03-12 15:48:10 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
To start a project, post a plan on the wiki (or your own wiki or blog). Go to your WikiName page, create a new page titled ProjectProposalYourWikiName. Tag your proposal with EN3177. And hand in a print version for my feedback and ok. Ok?
====What to cover in your plan====
- What you're going to look into. What you look into needs to connect with weblogs, wikis, social media ... or any of the topics we've looked at so far: produsage, ... There are hundreds of possible connections, but you need to make the connect.
- How are you going to investigate this? By what means or methods, and drawing on what sources? You will need to do some preliminary searching for this: materials to look at, people to talk to, links to make, activities to pursue, artifacts to create... You need to show weekly progress by way of aggregating, annotating, or repurposing, work those requirements into your plan.
- What will you produce as an artifact or set of artifacts? This could be a final repurposing, or a series or set of artifacts that you produce along the way.
- For what grade are you contracting? For this, detail your project //in measurable terms//: numbers. Think in terms of numbers of annotations, aggregations, and repurposings. Specify lengths and frequency of posting. Use good estimations here because you'll be held to them. Showing weekly progress by way of aggregating, annotating, or repurposing is expected. You're interested in the numbers here. Here are some guidelines on setting the contract
- 500 pts (about a C) for a general, non-topic-specific project. Reading, linking, and annotating 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 - 750 words each post.
- 750 pts (B) for a focused project, including reading, linking, and annotating, creating weekly artifacts, searching for subjects to discuss (not simply comment on but consider and delve into), 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 - 750 words or so. Can include artifacts outside of exposition: mind-maps, timelines, etc.
- 1000 pts (A) for a focused, extensive prctoje. Searching, reading, linking, and annotating, creating weekly artifacts, searching t some entries becoming 500 - 750 - 1000 word essays... For a wiki, focused, well-linked, but more developed, more richly linked, more organized than the B.
Your project has to be approved by me before it will be counted in your grade.
Deletions:
To start a project, post a plan on the wiki. Go to your WikiName page, create a new page titled ProjectProposalYourWikiName. Hand in a print version at the start of class on [TBA]. with en3177.
What to cover in your plan
- What you're going to look into. What you look into needs to connect with weblogs, wikis, social media ... or any of the topics we've looked at so far: produsage, ...
- How are you going to investigate this? By what means or methods, and using what sources? You will need to do some preliminary searching for this: materials to look at, people to talk to, links to make ... Because need to show weekly progress by way of aggregating, posting, or repurposing, work that requirement into your plan.
- What will you produce as an artifact or set of artifacts? This could be a final repurposing, or a series or set of works that you produce along the way.
- For what grade are you contracting? For this, detail the extent of your project //in measurable terms//: numbers. Think in terms of numbers of annotations, aggregations, and repurposings. Specify lengths and frequency of posting. Use good estimations here because you'll be held to them. Showing weekly progress by way of aggregating, annotating, or repurposing is expected. You're interested in the numbers here.
The project proposal sets out what you intend to work on during the rest of the semester. Because you're working pretty much on your own, I'm asking for some detailed thinking about the project. In writing your proposal, stay close to what you're being asked to address below. If your proposal is ambiguous or fuzzy or incomplete, I'll ask you to revise before approving your project.
Think of this project proposal as practice for a writing a grant. You'll need to be specific, semi-formal, and ringingly clear. Don't try to impress with language or be too clever. Grants try not to call attention to their language or the author; they focus on the project. Don't BS or strain for hype. Impress by designing an interesting and creative project that you and others will learn from.
Your project has to be approved by me before it will be counted in your grade. You're submitting this proposal a week before the projects actually start so that you have time to revise if necessary.
=== Wiki, Blog, Twitter, Tumblr? ===
You need to decide which writing space is appropriate for your project. Blogging and micro-blogging work with time and get much of their value by linking out. Wikis are topically arranged and develop over time, and link internally. Have a look at [[http://www.mattbarton.net/tikiwiki/tiki-read_article.php?articleId=4 Embrace the Wiki Way!]], Matt Barton, and //Wikis for Dummies// for some projects appropriate to wikis.
For blogs and micro-blogging, look around WordPress and through Rettberg. You might also look at what students have done in past years on the PastParticipants page.
=== Experiment or Research Study ===
You can come at this project as an experiment or research study into social media. Rather than focusing on creating a product, you could set up the project to investigate a use of the medium (using twitter in class. blogging class notes), situations or circumstances (when and where is twittering by phone welcome - when is it not), even more general experience: What's gained by following 10 freelance writers on twitter over 7 weeks? What can you find out?
To take this angle on the project, phrase your executive description as a hypothesis (Project: To discover if twittering class notes will help me master material. I hypothesize that it will lead to ...).
=== Reporting ===
Projects that involved weblogs or wikis are self-reporting. That is, we can both see how things are coming along week by week because you are posting regularly. Projects that involve Twitter do not self-report, so include writing a weekly report in your proposal.
==== Writing the Proposal ====
Use the following headings in your proposal. Again: This is like writing a grant. //Use the following headings and follow the requests or expect your proposal returned unread//.
=== Title of project ===
Go for a descriptive title rather than clever.
=== Your email address and URL for the project ===
You can use your current weblog or start a new one. For Twitter, use your current account or start a new one. If you're using a wiki, use Theony and Woods and a search for wikis to help you find a platform. For Tumblr, set up an account. If you're using more than one address, include them all.
=== Executive description ===
An overall description of the project: //In two well-formed sentences (no more, and no less)//: What are you going to do, why, and how does the writing space you're going to use (blog or wiki) help you do it? (You'll write this description last.)
=== Narrative ===
This is a detailed description of the project. In this section, address in detail what are you going to do, why, and how the writing space you're using serves the purposes you're aiming at.
Start with an overview of your intent. In a paragraph, explain what do you hope to do, or achieve, or find out.
Then, walk us through your project in more detail: What are you going to do first, second, third ... why specifically are you going to do that rather than something else, and what specifically you hope to learn about what from doing that. You want to link //what// you're doing with //what you expect// of that doing. In this section, address
What ideas or theory or other examples of blogs or wikis are you grounding your project in? For instance, if you're looking at setting up a community wiki, what other wikis have you looked at and what are you drawing on from them? What other blogs have you looked at? What are you borrowing, what will you be doing differently?
Describe how will the blog or wiki be designed. What will be in the blogroll, if you use one? What else on the side bar? If a wiki, have a look at Theony, chap 7, on categorizing.
What will you write about, what will the space contain? How will you use images if you use them?
If you're working with Tumblr, consider the kinds of media you will work with.

If you're working with Twitter, consider the times and places you will tweet.
Throughout this section, talk about linking the means (what you're doing) with the ends (what you intend to achieve by that doing), about writing, about what you aim to get from this project - and what value your project has to others.
**Note:** Go into enough detail in the narrative section so that another person could actually do your project as you envision it.
//In the last paragraph of this section//, mention how you envision your project report: Will it be a wiki essay or something on your blog? What will you deal with in this report - as specifically as you can imagine it now. You can change your mind on this one, but start thinking about it now. You'll be making a brief in-class presentation along with your report.
**Grad Students: Readings** Your project report (at the end of the project) will include some background reading or theory based on readings for the course and your own reading. So, include a section on outside reading you'll be doing for your project. The reading can be web-based or print; and can be in great part looking at other blogs and / or wikis. A preliminary bibliography is best, but you can also list or talk about the kinds of readings / sites you're thinking of looking at and how you see them tying in with what you're doing in the project. You might start with readings and sites on the BlogReadingsForCourse, WikiReadingsForCourse, or HypertextReadingsForCourse, as appropriate.
=== Weekly Report ===
For Twitter projects, include a weekly report of 750 - 1000 words. The report would a consideratoni of what happened that week and what that might mean: what you did, what went well, what went poorly, how you dealt with things. Detail in this section of your proposal what you will cover in this report.
=== Contract for Grade ===
In this section, detail the extent of your project //in measurable terms//: numbers. Think in terms of numbers of blog entries or wiki nodes, length, and frequency.
For instance, if you plan on keeping a blog, how often will you post? How long do you expect those posts to be? If you're working with others on a collective blog, how will you distribute the tasks? What will each person contribute? Who will be responsible for what?
Or if you're building a wiki, about how many nodes do you expect it to grow to? How often will you add material?
Set your contract. Here are some guidelines.
- 500 pts (about a C) for keeping a general, not topic specific blog three or four times a week, with entires of about 200 - 500 words/day. For a wiki, sort of a freeform, general notebook or collaboration of the same frequency and length. Twitter: 3 - 4- 5 tweets a day, as you feel appropriate.
- 750 pts (B) for a focused blog, including searching for subjects to blog on (online or off), with links to online material when appropriate, 3 - 4 times a week, about 500 words or so a day. For a wiki, focused, well-linked.
- 1000 pts (A) for a focused, extensive blog. Not just blogging 3 - 4 times a week, but some entries becoming 500 - 750 - 1000 word essays... For a wiki, focused, well-linked, but more developed, more richly linked, more organized than the B.


Revision [10120]

Edited on 2011-03-12 07:26:11 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be weekly materials to engage (read, view, look at), but rather than following the required activity beyond reading and responding, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project.
You will need to show weekly progress, and tag your aggregations, annotations, and repurposings with en3177 to submit them,
Deletions:
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be weekly materials to engage, but rather than following the required activity beyond reading and responding, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project.
You will need to show weekly progress, and tag your aggregations, annotations, and posts with en3177 to submit them,


Revision [10119]

Edited on 2011-03-12 07:22:50 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
=====Project Proposal - MOOC Version=====
A project is optional, but it gives you a way to direct your learning towards a topic or interest of your own design. There will still be weekly materials to engage, but rather than following the required activity beyond reading and responding, you can use the week to make //recorded// progress on your project.
You will need to show weekly progress, and tag your aggregations, annotations, and posts with en3177 to submit them,
To start a project, post a plan on the wiki. Go to your WikiName page, create a new page titled ProjectProposalYourWikiName. Hand in a print version at the start of class on [TBA]. with en3177.
What to cover in your plan
- What you're going to look into. What you look into needs to connect with weblogs, wikis, social media ... or any of the topics we've looked at so far: produsage, ...
- How are you going to investigate this? By what means or methods, and using what sources? You will need to do some preliminary searching for this: materials to look at, people to talk to, links to make ... Because need to show weekly progress by way of aggregating, posting, or repurposing, work that requirement into your plan.
- What will you produce as an artifact or set of artifacts? This could be a final repurposing, or a series or set of works that you produce along the way.
- For what grade are you contracting? For this, detail the extent of your project //in measurable terms//: numbers. Think in terms of numbers of annotations, aggregations, and repurposings. Specify lengths and frequency of posting. Use good estimations here because you'll be held to them. Showing weekly progress by way of aggregating, annotating, or repurposing is expected. You're interested in the numbers here.
The project proposal sets out what you intend to work on during the rest of the semester. Because you're working pretty much on your own, I'm asking for some detailed thinking about the project. In writing your proposal, stay close to what you're being asked to address below. If your proposal is ambiguous or fuzzy or incomplete, I'll ask you to revise before approving your project.
Think of this project proposal as practice for a writing a grant. You'll need to be specific, semi-formal, and ringingly clear. Don't try to impress with language or be too clever. Grants try not to call attention to their language or the author; they focus on the project. Don't BS or strain for hype. Impress by designing an interesting and creative project that you and others will learn from.
Deletions:
=====Project Proposal=====
Compose and submit a project proposal. Post this on the wiki. Go to your WikiName page, create a new page titled ProjectProposalYourWikiName. Hand in a print version at the start of class on Wednesday, 3 March. Firm. No extensions.
The project proposal sets out what you intend to work on during the rest of the semester. Because you're working pretty much on your own, I'm asking for some detailed thinking about the project. In writing your proposal, stay close to what you're being asked to address below. If your proposal is ambiguous or fuzzy or incomplete, I'll ask you to revise before approving your project.
Think of this project proposal as practice for a writing a grant. You'll need to be specific, semi-formal, and ringingly clear. Don't try to impress with language or be too clever. Grants try not to call attention to their language or the author; they focus on the project. Don't BS or strain for hype. Impress by designing an interesting and creative project that you and others will learn from.


Revision [10118]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2011-03-12 06:59:29 by MorganAdmin
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