Revision history for BloggingBlogsExercise


Revision [5248]

Last edited on 2009-01-11 14:16:12 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
CategoryExercise CategoryRetired
Deletions:
CategoryExercise


Revision [716]

Edited on 2007-02-02 05:39:46 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- Read Blood, chap 1 - blogs, notebooks, and filters - and chap 2: reasons for blogging, and 3/
- Yang, chaps 12 - 15 for kinds and genres of blogs.
You can focus on whatever you wish: the content and ideas or the style of the blog, or both. But might start by referring to Blood, chap 1 - 3 to get a sense of what to look for when you read a blog. Or you might focus on blogs in your area of interest or profession (that is, news blogs, personal blogs, pundit blogs, scholarly blogs, or gaming blogs, tech blogs ...) Up to you.
- Use Blood's distinctions to help you identify the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else **and**
- Use Yang to help you identity the genre the blog seems to be: personal, professional, fantasy, journalism, pundit, scholarly, educational ... check Yang for others.
transform the feeling of "this is interesting" into a succinct description of why [the blog] is worth a read. (Blood, p. 30)
**Link to the blog you're blogging**. If you haven't yet, try creating links: They are the lifeblood of the Web. Refer to Yang, chap. 9.
Deletions:
- Read Blood, chap 1 - blogs, notebooks, and filters - and chap 2: reasons for blogging.
- Yang, chaps 12 - 15 for kinds or genres of blogs.
You can focus on whatever you wish: the content and ideas or the style of the blog, or both. But might start by referring to Blood, chap 1 - 3 to get a sense of what to look for when you read a blog. You might focus on blogs in your area of interest or profession (that is, news blogs, personal blogs, pundit blogs, scholarly blogs, or gaming blogs, tech blogs ...) Up to you.
- Use Blood's distinctions to help you identify the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else and
- Use Yang to help; you identity the genre the blog seems to be: personal, professional, fantasy, journalism, pundit, scholarly, educational ... check Yang for others.
transform the feeling of 'this is interesting' into a succinct description of why [the blog] is worth a read. (Blood, p. 30)
**Link to the blog you're blogging**. If you haven't yet, try creating links: They are the lifeblood of the Web. Refer to [new text]


Revision [607]

Edited on 2007-01-22 13:22:36 by MorganMC
Additions:
Bloggers blog blogs and other web sites to figure out what they think about them.
- Read Blood, chap 1 - blogs, notebooks, and filters - and chap 2: reasons for blogging.
- Yang, chaps 12 - 15 for kinds or genres of blogs.
You can focus on whatever you wish: the content and ideas or the style of the blog, or both. But might start by referring to Blood, chap 1 - 3 to get a sense of what to look for when you read a blog. You might focus on blogs in your area of interest or profession (that is, news blogs, personal blogs, pundit blogs, scholarly blogs, or gaming blogs, tech blogs ...) Up to you.
- Use Blood's distinctions to help you identify the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else and
- Use Yang to help; you identity the genre the blog seems to be: personal, professional, fantasy, journalism, pundit, scholarly, educational ... check Yang for others.
[Part 2: Visit and comment.]
Deletions:
Bloggers blog blogs and other web sites to figure out what they think about them. Refer to Blood, chap 1 - blogs, notebooks, and filters - and chap 2: reasons for blogging.
You can focus on whatever you wish: the content and ideas or the style of the blog, or both. But might start by referring to Blood, chap 1 - 3 to get a sense of what to look for when you read a blog. You might focus on blogs in your area of interest or profession (that is, news blogs, personal blogs, pundit blogs, scholarly blogs, or gaming blogs, tech blogs ...) Up to you.
- Identify the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else and
- Identity the genre it seems to be: personal, journalistic, pundit, scholarly ... check XYZ for others.


Revision [606]

Edited on 2007-01-21 14:36:15 by MorganMC
Additions:
You can focus on whatever you wish: the content and ideas or the style of the blog, or both. But might start by referring to Blood, chap 1 - 3 to get a sense of what to look for when you read a blog. You might focus on blogs in your area of interest or profession (that is, news blogs, personal blogs, pundit blogs, scholarly blogs, or gaming blogs, tech blogs ...) Up to you.
Deletions:
You can focus on whatever you wish: the content and ideas or the style of the blog, or both. But might start by referring to Blood, chap 1 - 3 to get a sense of what to look for when you read a blog. Blood mentions considering


Revision [600]

Edited on 2007-01-21 14:17:12 by MorganMC
Additions:
==== Blogging Blogs Exercise ====
Deletions:
=== Blogging Blogs ===


Revision [599]

Edited on 2007-01-21 14:16:52 by MorganMC
Additions:
You can focus on whatever you wish: the content and ideas or the style of the blog, or both. But might start by referring to Blood, chap 1 - 3 to get a sense of what to look for when you read a blog. Blood mentions considering
- Identify the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else and
- Identity the genre it seems to be: personal, journalistic, pundit, scholarly ... check XYZ for others.
- Identify what the purpose behind the blog seems to be: self-expression, reputation building, giving info - or some of each, or something else.
Then go on to consider | describe | talk about the blog you're looking at and what the blogger seems to be doing on the blog.
Watch how the blogger defines his or her own blog: bloggers often state their purposes in their description, or a colophon, or on the sidebar. Then you can consider how the blogger is fulfilling the stated purpose in some of the postings.
To create a succinct description: Describe and interpret what you're looking at, rather than your impressions of it. Keep it informal. But get down to talking about specifics, examples. These will substantiate your impression of what you're looking at, and the closer you substantiate it, the more your particular sense of the blog comes to the surface. The self is in the details.
Deletions:
You can focus on whatever you wish: the content and ideas or the style of the blog, or both. But you might start by referring to Blood, chap 1 - 3 to get a sense of what to look for when you read a blog. Blood mentions considering
- the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else and
- what the purpose behind the blog seems to be: self-expression, reputation building, giving info - or some of each, or something else.
Identifying kinds and purposes aren't ends in themselves; rather, use kinds and purposes can help you start thinking about the blog you're looking at and what the blogger seems to be doing on the blog.
Watch, too, for how the blogger defines her blog: bloggers often state their purposes in their description, or a colophon, or on the sidebar. Then you can consider how the blogger is fulfilling the stated purpose in some of the postings.
To see what you say, say what you see: Describe and interpret what you're looking at. Keep it informal. But get down to talking about specifics, examples. These will substantiate ''your'' impression of what you're looking at, and the closer you substantiate it, the more your particular sense of the blog comes to the surface. The self is in the details.


Revision [598]

Edited on 2007-01-21 14:12:16 by MorganMC
Additions:
=== Blogging Blogs ===
Bloggers blog blogs and other web sites to figure out what they think about them. Refer to Blood, chap 1 - blogs, notebooks, and filters - and chap 2: reasons for blogging.
**Contract for points** (50 - 75 - 150 or 200 points for the entire exercise, not each blog). I'll let you decide on your engagement with the assignment. You can review the CourseStatement2007 for more explanation on this.
When you're done, **post a note to the [[http://blogsandwikisdaybook.blogspot.com/ Daybook]] with a link to your first post, and mention how many points you're contracting for**.
Deletions:
Bloggers blog blogs and other web sites to figure out what they think about them.
Or
How can I know what I think until I see what I say?
Refer to Blood, chap 1 - blogs, notebooks, and filters - and chap 2: reasons for blogging.
Or, as E M Forester puts it,
How can I know what I think until I see what I say?
If you're looking for blogs, start with the BlogSites for the course.
Contract for points (50 - 75 - 150 or 200 points for the entire exercise, not each blog). I'll let you decide on your engagement with the assignment. You can review the CourseStatement2007 for more explanation on this.
When you're done, post a note to the [[http://blogsandwikisdaybook.blogspot.com/ Daybook]] with a link to your first post, and mention how many points you're contracting for.


Revision [597]

Edited on 2007-01-21 14:10:32 by MorganMC
Additions:
**Assignment**: To expand your sense of what's possible in blogging, and to get a sense of what bloggers do when they blog, blog 3 blogs not from this class.
- Use a separate posting for each blog. The good observation postings seem to develop for 500 words or so. They pay some extended attention to the blog.
- You will have to peruse the blog for a while, reading some of the entries slowly, carefully, and others quickly and impressionistically.
- the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else and
**Link to the blog you're blogging**. If you haven't yet, try creating links: They are the lifeblood of the Web. Refer to [new text]
Deletions:
To expand your sense of what's possible in blogging, and to get a sense of what bloggers do when they blog, blog 3 blogs not from this class.
Use a separate posting for each blog. The good observation postings seem to develop for 500 words or so. They pay some extended attention to the blog.
You will have to peruse the blog for a while, reading some of the entries slowly, carefully, and others quickly and impressionistically.
- the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else
and
**Link to the blog you're blogging**. If you haven't yet, try creating links: They are the lifeblood of the Web. Refer to Castro, pp 16ff.


Revision [596]

Edited on 2007-01-21 14:08:33 by MorganMC
Additions:
Contract for points (50 - 75 - 150 or 200 points for the entire exercise, not each blog). I'll let you decide on your engagement with the assignment. You can review the CourseStatement2007 for more explanation on this.
Deletions:
Contract for points (50 - 75 - 150 or 200 points for the entire exercise, not each blog). I'll let you decide on your engagement with the assignment. You can review the CourseSyllabus for more explanation on this.


Revision [496]

Edited on 2007-01-15 18:46:29 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
When you're done, post a note to the [[http://blogsandwikisdaybook.blogspot.com/ Daybook]] with a link to your first post, and mention how many points you're contracting for.
Deletions:
When you're done, post a note to the Daybook with a link to your first post, and mention how many points you're contracting for.


Revision [495]

Edited on 2007-01-15 18:45:30 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
Or
Deletions:
Or http://ferret.bemidjistate.edu/~morgan/WeblogsAndWikis/3rdparty/plugins/wikiedit/images/bold.gif


Revision [494]

Edited on 2007-01-15 18:43:20 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- 50 - drive thru: quick fly by, burger and fries, had a quick look, but too busy to really engage it...
- 75 - deli lunch: had an hour to kill so I had a quick look round, knocked off these observations and did a quick edit. Thanks very much.
- 150 - long lunch: I started as a deli lunch, but as I worked it got interesting, and I got involved in it - and it shows in the writing.
- 200 - dinner: This is the closest and most insightful I can get in the 2 - 3 hours I put into this. Couldn't add another thing, not a sausage, not a comma, not even a paper-thin wafer.
Deletions:
* 50 - drive thru: quick fly by, burger and fries, had a quick look, but too busy to really engage it...
* 75 - deli lunch: had an hour to kill so I had a quick look round, knocked off these observations and did a quick edit. Thanks very much.
* 150 - long lunch: I started as a deli lunch, but as I worked it got interesting, and I got involved in it - and it shows in the writing.
* 200 - dinner: This is the closest and most insightful I can get in the 2 - 3 hours I put into this. Couldn't add another thing, not a sausage, not a comma, not even a paper-thin wafer.


Revision [493]

Edited on 2007-01-15 18:42:29 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
Or http://ferret.bemidjistate.edu/~morgan/WeblogsAndWikis/3rdparty/plugins/wikiedit/images/bold.gif
To expand your sense of what's possible in blogging, and to get a sense of what bloggers do when they blog, blog 3 blogs not from this class.
- the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else
- what the purpose behind the blog seems to be: self-expression, reputation building, giving info - or some of each, or something else.
transform the feeling of 'this is interesting' into a succinct description of why [the blog] is worth a read. (Blood, p. 30)
How can I know what I think until I see what I say?
What I'd really like to see you try is connecting Blood's comments and thinking about blogging with your own, growing understanding of it, as you see those ideas played out in others' blogs. Blood writes about audience and about readership, for instance. Those ideas will surface in any blog. You can ask, Who is the readership for this blog? and how does the blogger tailor her postings for that readership? Or is this a blog for the writer alone? A blogger might copy and paste a passage to focus on, then comment on it, develop it, speculate, link to similar and dissimilar sites....
**Link to the blog you're blogging**. If you haven't yet, try creating links: They are the lifeblood of the Web. Refer to Castro, pp 16ff.
Deletions:
Or
:'''To expand your sense of what's possible in blogging, and to get a sense of what bloggers do when they blog, blog 3 blogs not from this class.'''
* the kind of blog it seems to be: filter, notebook, journal, some of each, something else
* what the purpose behind the blog seems to be: self-expression, reputation building, giving info - or some of each, or something else.
: transform the feeling of 'this is interesting' into a succinct description of why [the blog] is worth a read. (Blood, p. 30)
: How can I know what I think until I see what I say?
: What I'd really like to see you try is connecting Blood's comments and thinking about blogging with your own, growing understanding of it, as you see those ideas played out in others' blogs. Blood writes about audience and about readership, for instance. Those ideas will surface in any blog. You can ask, Who is the readership for this blog? and how does the blogger tailor her postings for that readership? Or is this a blog for the writer alone? A blogger might copy and paste a passage to focus on, then comment on it, develop it, speculate, link to similar and dissimilar sites....
'''Link to the blog you're blogging.''' If you haven't yet, try creating links: They are the lifeblood of the Web. Refer to Castro, pp 16ff.


Revision [479]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2007-01-15 18:04:52 by MorganAdmin
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