Memes Wiki

Course wiki for ENGL 2930: Dreams, Memes, and Twittering Machines

Founder

RachelScales email 2017/02/13 15:54

I Write Sins Not Tragedies music video (Original)

173,747,351 views as of 2/19/2017

Chart the memetic dimensions

Content

  • Music video for Panic! At the Disco’s “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” single
  • Set at a wedding – Usually a sanctioned and respectable event, but made light of because of rumors of the bride’s promiscuity
  • Urie starts with his hat partially obscuring his face, looking down – Clockwork Orange reference? At one point, he also makes a cross with his index fingers in front of his mouth, which is one of the stills most frequently used for the deriv. memes.
  • The bride's side of the church is filled with quiet, respectable mimes The groom's side is empty until the chorus hits, when the ringleader bursts in and circus performers start to pour in. There are men on stilts, strongmen, dancers, bearded lady, etc. A mustachioed performer from the groom's side blows a pocket full of glitter toward the bride's side, which seems to hypnotize the mimes into standing up and dancing, or sitting down at the mustachioed performer's cue. The bride storms out, angry that her designated groom has accused her of promiscuity, and is followed by a man from the back row. The ringleader commands the groom to follow her, and she is found kissing the man who left with her. The groom then takes over as ringleader.

Form

  • Professionally filmed and edited music video
  • It’s set as a wedding, but all the guests are mimes
  • The mimes seem resigned to go through the traditional motions and keep quiet, but one breaks the vow of silence to share her thoughts about the bride, which opens the door for everyone else to share their thoughts on it as well, and for the band and their circus performers to chime in

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Within the world of the music video, only the bride and groom should be allowed to participate, but as soon as Brendon makes his interruption, he makes it so everyone is participating. Within the greater structure of the video, only the band and the actors are allowed to participate.
  • It starts in a serious register, as a wedding is a fairly serious event of adult life, but there are elements of childishness in the circus performer theme and the way all hell breaks loose in the middle of a serious event.
  • Communication functions.
    • There’s definitely an Emotive Function at play here – Urie’s hook is literally interrupting a wedding
    • There’s a bit of Phatic Function here, too – mostly just with the bridesmaid speaking to the waiter
Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • founder meme
Comments
  • emo anthem icon

Variations

RachelScales email 2017/03/05 19:50

Version 1

9153 views as of 2/16/2017

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Content

  • Brendon Urie, lead singer of Panic! At The Disco, substitutes “a beautiful woman” in for the original lyric of his song while performing at the Miss Universe pageant in 2013
  • The camera pans to follow Urie as he crosses the stage, emphasizing him as the focus of the broadcast
  • This is not the only instance of Brendon doing this – whether for fun at concerts or censorship purposes when he sings live
  • He usually sings whatever pops into his head at the moment, but this instance was likely scripted due to the context of his performance at the Miss Universe pageant

Form

  • A 5 second clip pulled from a live Panic! At The Disco performance of “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” at the Miss Universe pageant in 2013
    * professionally staged broadcast recording, edited down by YouTuber “trash smash”.

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure.
    • Urie is the only one participating in the clip, but anyone who has heard the original song and knows the lyric are allowed in on the joke.
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style.
    • It’s definitely somewhat sarcastic or mocking, because that particular line of the song is pretty iconic, so regardless of Urie’s choice of censorship, there will probably be a majority of viewers who know the original line.
    • The tone is pretty professional. Urie changed the line in this performance for a reason, and even though he’s having fun performing, he’s still keeping it professional
  • Communication functions.
    • Could be referential – especially the ironic juxtaposition between the original and the alternate lyrics
    • Otherwise likely poetic. Urie is staging a performance, so it’s his craft and his art in motion, and he’s using an alternative lyric to send a message to the Miss Universe contestants.
    Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • again, not the only instance of Urie subbing in various lyrics in concert or public performances, but the only one besides the original with the same professional tone

Specify the kind of variation

  • I want to call this a mimicry - but the definition in the book states that mimicry would be an imitation done by someone else, while this version is done by Urie – the singer from the founder version – himself. Does that bring it to another level, or is it just a mimicry in an unusual form that has been recognized by the creator of the original content which became the meme?

memetic features

An extended consideration of those features that make the meme memetic. Draw on Shifman's list of features, but also supplement her observations with your own.

  • Positivity - Urie has meme'd his lyrics into something more flattering (though the context doesn't erase the sarcasm underlying it). Still, part of what makes this particular instance of the meme so amusing is that it's Urie himself changing the lyrics into something kinder
  • Prestige - it's Brendon Urie. “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” was released in 2006, so by this performance in 2013, it was one of a well-known band's most famous songs. Additionally, it was performed during a Miss Universe pageant, which is an internationally broadcasted program.
  • playfulness – the song's original lyrics, as I've mentioned, are pretty well known, as is Urie's tendency to alter them at will during live performances. To see him replace the lyrics is funny – and so is the face he makes at the very end of the clip

Genre

  • i'm gonna call this a full-circle meme, which is a technical term that i just made up 5 seconds ago. A meme doesn't always get to go full-circle, to be acknowledged/redone by the person to first initiate the meme or create the founder, so those that do are fairly special. Full-circle memes are best in cases such as this, or the unexpected john cena meme, where the famous person involved in the founder recreates part of the founder in a new variation of the meme.

Version 2

65,949 views as of 2/19/17

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Content

  • A seven second clip of a lyric from “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” by Panic! At the Disco, edited to transition into a three second clip of John Cena's WWE theme song, including John Cena's face photoshopped on the face of the bride from the Panic! music video
  • Combining the “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” meme with the “Unexpected John Cena” meme
  • Presents the idea that, instead of being a whore, the bride is actually John Cena. Whether this makes the situation better or worse is not implied and must be decided on an individual basis.
  • Why call someone a whore when you could call them literally anything else?

Form

  • It starts with the clip from the beginning of the “I Write Sins Not Tragedies Video”, then changes to the John Cena theme song, transitioning with John Cena’s head photoshopped onto the bride’s face.
  • The phrasing of the original song lyric makes it very easy to substitute alternatives as to what the bride might be (thanks Brendon)

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure.
  • As opposed to the original music video, where just those contained in the video are participating, this meme extends the participation structure out to John Cena, as well as internet users who are familiar with either of these memes.
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style.
    • Definitely mocking, as with most of these memes. They’re almost all structured around substituting literally anything in place of the word “whore” in the lyric and taking advantage of how open ended the joke be.
    • The tone is pretty funny and joking. Nobody expects unexpected John Cena.
  • Communication functions.
    • Definitely referential, considering how it’s just taking two memes and smashing them together. Prior knowledge of both memes and variations of their separate identities in the memescape is helpful, though not required, to fully understand the joke at hand.
    Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • 22 second mark - even Urie's on board with this one (couldn’t find a date on the concert clip to say which version came first)

Specify the kind of variation

  • remix – the creator has taken this meme and used video editing to parody the founder

memetic features

  • simplicity - part of what made “I write sins” such a good meme was the simplicity in which alternative endings to “what a shame the poor groom's bride is ” could be substituted.
    * Incongruity - there's humor to be found in john cena cropping up in lieu of the bride, and his wwe theme overtaking the bouncy p!atd tune in mid-verse

Genre

  • i would fit this variation into the reaction photoshop genre shifman outlines, but it's also a melding of two different memes together, which likely crosses genre lines. To come up with a name for this new genre on the spot? memesplice – splicing two memes together to make a single variation which fits under the umbrellas of both memes – in this case, the variation fits both into the “I write sins” meme and the “unexpected john cena” meme.

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Version 3

18,367 notes on Tumblr as of 2/17/2017

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Content

  • A textpost made by Tumblr user stardustyles, reciting a lyric from Panic! At The Disco's “I Write Sins Not Tragedies”, but then uses an image of a s'more in lieu of writing the word “whore”
  • the bride is now a “s’more”, which is much nicer than a whore
  • while there are a number of ways to phrase what the viewer is seeing in the picture – graham cracker sandwich, etc – the association of the actual lyric contributes to finding the intended phrase – s’more – to sub in for the original lyric

Form

  • Uses a rhyming word in place of the original lyric to riff on the meme
  • Doesn’t actually say the punchline, but instead uses an image of a smore to finish the joke

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure.
  • When the format changes from video to image, the participation structure blows wide open, not only for viewers, but for content creators. Those who might not as frequently visit avenues like Vine or YouTube, or skip over videos in their other social media feeds, will still probably see images. Additionally, it takes at least a little skill and effort to splice video clips together, while any schmuck with an internet connection can google a stock picture of a smore and make a text post.
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style.
    • Funny/Mocking. Amateur.
    • A very simple meme – especially in comparison to the videos – but just as effective in riffing on the original line.
  • Communication functions.
  • Referential. With this one, if you don’t know the song, you probably won’t understand the joke. With the videos it took less context, because the song was actually present, but this image is only a reference to the song and therefore requires a bit more forehand knowledge.
Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • this one is an image instead of a video clip, but the image will expand the participation structure to those who wouldn't make a video edit

Specify the kind of variation

  • remake – this is a photo variation, deviating from the original video format to present a new, remade variation of the meme.

memetic features

  • There's humor working on a bunch of levels here. It's whimsical because lets be honest, smores are pretty whimsical. they're definitely not serious person food. you've never seen someone eat a smore at a black tie gala with a straight look on their face. no. their very name is a joke, and therefore they are whimsical. but there's also the incongruity at work in the meme - a smore is unexpected to be seen (or heard) at the end of a sentence which begins “what a shame the poor groom's bride is a –”. It fits into the rhyme scheme and the meter, yes – which adds to the humor – but it's unexpected.
  • simplicity - what is more simple than replacing a word with a random, rhyming word? that's what's so perfect about this meme. and the simplicity is just taken up a notch since it's a text post with an attached photo – pretty much the lowest level of effort you can put into a meme.

Genre

  • misheard lyrics – that's essentially what this boils down to. since “smore” and “whore” are very similar, phonetically, replacing one for the other is the simplest thing in the world and would be very easy to mishear if you weren't paying total attention to the song. how else do you think to make a meme that literally reads “the poor groom's bride is a smore”?

Version 4

13,996 views as of 2/17/2017

Chart the memetic dimensions

Content

  • A clip from the “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” music video, edited to interject a brief clip from a Marlon Webb vine where he wears a watermelon on his head while riding a bike and exclaims “watermelon” where the word “whore” is in the original song.
  • The bride is a watermelon.
  • Or maybe Marlon Webb wearing a watermelon as a hat.
  • Either one is fairly unexpected and humorous

Form

  • Takes the clip from the P!ATD music video, then splices in a clip of Vine star Marlon Webb wearing a watermelon on his head and saying “watermelon” in the pronunciation which distinguished him on Vine.
  • I believe this video was originally posted as a vine, not a youtube video, but after Vine's website was taken down, it's difficult to trace back this particular deriv's origin.

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure.
  • Urie – Webb – internet users familiar with either meme and in on the joke. Actually, this one’s pretty open, because it doesn’t require much contextual knowledge to be funny.
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style.
    • Mocking. A bit adolescent, as it isn’t built on any substantial joke aside from “he said watermelon instead of whore and that’s funny”.
  • Communication functions.
  • Referential – if viewers have prior knowledge of Marlon Webb, they’ll find this even more amusing than someone who just views it and hears an unexpected “watermelon” in lieu of the original lyric.
  • Otherwise, perhaps Phatic – a substitution for the sake of contributing in the meme and providing an interjection which viewers will not expect
Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • doesn't cut off immediately after the substituted phrase, which is interesting

Specify the kind of variation

  • remix – the variation of the lyrics isn't redone – simply edited to be different than the founder.

memetic features

  • playfulness and incongruity – simply put, you're not expecting to see Marlon Webb with a watermelon on his head instead of a bride. it's unexpected, and it's funny just for the sake of being funny. i personally can't think of a way to describe why this one is so humorous other than the simple shock value of the substitution, but it wouldn't be as funny had the shock value substitution just been someone screaming or something. it's specifically the unexpectedness of “WATERMELON” and a man in a watermelon helmet.

Genre

  • this one really doesn't fit into shifman's genres either, so i'm back at it again with a third completely made-up genre. Viral remix. There's a difference between this variation and the john cena variation. the john cena meme is a meme of its own, while marlon webb isn't. what marlon webb IS, is a viral web star. but when remixing memes, a lot of creators do mash up memes with viral content, especially viral vines. marlon webb hasn't been meme'd, to my knowledge, but his vines are viral and have been commonly used as the remix element to memes. it's kind of like when people use spongebob audio/video clips as a remix – the specific clip they used isn't a meme, but it's familiar enough to be used as the meme and people will understand the reference.

Version 5

720,039 notes on Tumblr as of 2/17/2017

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Content

  • a tumblr post started by tumblr user enorace reciting the beginning of a lyric from “I Write Sins Not Tragedies”, and reblogged by tumblr user taliasterology finishing the line with “Donald Trump Supporter”
  • Politically charged deriv meme

Form

  • It’s posed as kind of a call and response – tumblr user enorace started the meme, and tumblr user taliasterology filled in the blank
  • It’s very simple – just a tumblr text post. No video, no image, just knowledge of the song and how the meme works in substituting variations

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure.
  • Two tumblr users are participating, but this style of meme opens the participation up to anyone who can make a tumblr text post – or at least reblog and make a comment on one. In a somewhat broader sense, anyone who finds it a shame that a woman would be a Donald Trump supporter is participating, in perpetuating the spread of this particular version of the meme
  • Keying. Addresses tone and style.
  • Sarcastic or mocking – mostly toward Donald Trump supporters, rather than toward the song like might otherwise be implied. Amateur. The simplicity of the text post function makes it a pretty straightforward meme.
  • Communication functions.
  • Referential – again, knowledge of the song is helpful to understand the meme, and a knowledge of Donald Trump supporters and the aura/attitude surrounding them only furthers this.
Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • this one is purely text-based – relying on someone else to finish the sentence in a creative way to perpetuate the meme

Specify the kind of variation

  • mimicry - mimicking the founder with a variation, but not editing the founder to make it. the textpost makes it redone and a mimicry of the founder.

memetic features

  • ordinary people – while shifman uses youtube culture to describe this, i think it still works for tumblr. nobody uses tumblr to get famous or make money. all famous people on tumblr get are angry anons who try to be their volunteer life coaches. tumblr is an open format and while not entirely anonymous, is formatted so that unless you're a hyper-dedicated follower of a certain blog, you probably don't know whose content you're seeing at that particular moment.
  • playfulness and incongruity are what most of these “I write sins” memes are built on, but this one i think is delving into the superiority realm as well. donald trump isn't really a funny person, but he's still the butt of quite a few jokes, and he works – at least in this instance – pretty well as being that incongruous factor in the meme. at least the joke he's the butt of this time isn't America
  • simplicity - the great part about this being in a tumblr post format is that it's super easy to recreate and further one's own variation of a meme.

Genre

  • this is kind of a political genre. it's a meme that's just specific and politically-charged enough to resonate

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Version 6

2/17/2017

Chart the memetic dimensions

Content

  • Starts with a still of Brendon Urie singing “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” for a live radio performance. The image is in black and white, with yellow captions reading the lyric “What a shame the poor groom's bride is a whore”
  • below is a still from from The Hangover, in which Zach Galifianakis’ character is seated on the ground near a car and takes issue with a man claiming he married a whore, and defends the wife by saying “she’s a nice lady”
  • Rather than substituting a random phrase into the lyric, this meme is set up as a response to it

Form

The construction of the artifact. This includes its physical incarnation. Visual design and features. Genre.

  • Photo still - two images combined into a photoset
  • Interestingly, the meme creator didn’t use the traditional image of Urie from the music video, and instead used an image from a live performance of the song to pair with the reaction image

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure. the meme creator is opening the participation structure to anyone who knows the song or the movie, The Hangover. Or, honestly, just anyone who takes issue with calling someone a whore.
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style. Funny. Maybe mocking. These pretty much all just mock the song’s lyrics.
    • it’s interesting that they chose the live performance image, which is in black and white, when they could have gone with the music video image, which is in color, like the secondary image.
  • Communication functions. What kind of information is being communicated? Referential. Conative. Emotive. Code. Poetic. Reflexive.
    • Emotive. This meme is reflecting the state of mind of someone taking issue with name calling. It’s referring back to the original song, but this meme focuses more on the emotion and reaction contained in the actual image.
Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • again – uses the alternate P!ATD image when they could have used the music video. That one is throwing me. Why did they do that.

Specify the kind of variation

  • remix – they haven't altered the founder – just reacted to a specific part of it.

memetic features

  • humor - obviously, Zach Galifinakis and the Hangover is a humorous aspect to add to the lyric as a meme variation. it's playful and obviously intended to be humorous.
  • most of the photo meme variations are pretty simple - i didn't pull out too many heavily edited ones. they aren't altered from their original states as screen captures, but simply melded together for the sake of the meme

Genre

  • i'm having a hard time pinpointing the genre of this one. like i can't even make one up that feels accurate enough. i wanted to call it a reaction photoshop, but it isn't really photoshopped beyond however the creator melded their two images together. it's just… a reaction. is that enough of a genre? image two is a reaction to image one. i've seen memes that go like that without the photoshop element. we're gonna call it a reaction.

version 7

Accessed 2/19/2017

Chart the memetic dimensions

Content

The ideas and ideologies that are presented.

  • basically to break something down until it can be argued as its opposite – in this meme’s case, breaking down the literal meaning of the meme into something ridiculous and oversimplified. Also deconstructivism - a poststructural art movement featuring fragmented or asymmetrical construction. A derivative movement of Deconstructionism.
  • The meme starts with the iconic lyric “The poor groom's bride is a whore” and breaks it down into increasingly simplistic terms while also breaking the image down into increasingly poor redrawings of the image of Urie dressed as the ringleader making a cross with his fingers.

Form

The construction of the artifact. This includes is physical incarnation. Visual design and features. Genre.

  • Three stages – the first is the direct meme reference and image. Second, a simplified version of the image (MS paint drawing, perhaps?) accompanied by a breakdown of what the first caption says. Third, an even more exaggerated dumbing down of both the image and the breakdown, to the point where it’s barely recognizable but still adequate to understand the reference when paired with the prior incarnations.

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure. Who is participating and in what manner? Deconstructionists. Not everyone participating in the meme is familiar with Derrida, but they are familiar with the function of the meme and the deconstructing of a concept to a farce
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style. Ironic or mocking. The register depends on how much thought is being put into the meme – Derrida is a philosopher, and therefore placed in an adult register, but for those just perpetuating the meme, it’s likely amateur, or even adolescent, as the final image becomes so far broken down it looks like a child’s drawing.
  • Communication functions. What kind of information is being communicated? Referential. Conative. Emotive. Code. Poetic. Reflexive.
    • Referential, certainly. Each stage of the meme refers to the previous, and the meme as a whole refers back to the founder video.
      • It’s also a bit metalingual, particularly the last one, as it just gets increasingly self-referential.
      Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • it looks like it was done in MS Paint, which is where the best memes are made, in my opinion

Specify the kind of variation

  • remake – this one's pretty emphasized in the remake department, as it contains three separate instances of the remake in a single meme. each successive image and caption further breaks down the composition of the remake element until it's an entirely new meme

memetic features

  • simplicity - what's actually so funny about this meme is that it's over-simplified. simplified to the point where someone actually put a fairly significant amount of effort into it, and it wasn't simple at all. simplicity to a farce.
  • humor - superiority, specifically. it's half taking on an air of pretentiousness, in continuing to explain and reexplain the meme, but it's also dumbing it down so far that it's explaining itself - like self-awareness through the decomposition of itself
  • repetitiveness - this meme is repeating itself. each of the variation is different and increasingly simple/elaborate in their presentation, but it's still saying the same thing each time when you get right down to it.

Genre

  • philosophical. does that count as a genre? i think it does. if a meme can get existential, i can call it out on it. this meme is so self-aware and i hate it because while i know what “the poor groom's bride is a whore” means, i wouldn't have thought to explain it in such explicit detail. not even with last semester's two week unit on Jaques Derrida. the meme knows. the meme understands its function as a meme.
Comments
  • finally, last semester’s literary theory seminar comes in handy. For memes. My English degree will be so useful in the real world.

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version 8

Accessed 2/19/2017

Chart the memetic dimensions

Content

  • An image still from an episode of SpongeBob SquarePants featuring SpongeBob's prehistoric ancestor, SpongeGar, with his limbs spread wide, looking surprised/confused/out of place. The image is accompanied by the caption “when you find out the grooms bride is a whore” as a direct reference to “I Write Sins Not Tragedies”
  • uses the SpongeGar meme as a reaction to the scenario supplied by the “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” song

Form

The construction of the artifact. This includes its physical incarnation. Visual design and features. Genre.

  • Not only is SpongeGar being used as a reaction image, he has been photoshopped to wear the familiar tophat, gloves, and emo eyeliner Urie sports in the “I Write Sins” music video.
  • black on white text above a meme reaction image

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure. SpongeGar could be considered a participant, as his reaction is the one being utilized in this meme. Otherwise, those familiar with the use of the SpongeGar meme or those familiar with the “I Write Sins” meme
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style.
      * funny, mocking.  Definitely mocking Urie’s outfit in the video to an extent.
      * i’d say amature, though the photoshop work definitely took a little effort.
    • Communication functions. What kind of information is being communicated? Referential. Conative. Emotive. Code. Poetic. Reflexive.
    • Referential. Especially with the photoshop work, it’s very clearly a callback to the music video, and those who haven’t seen at least the still of Urie’s outfit from the video won’t understand the meme very well.
    Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • Instead of just using a reaction image, or splicing some clips together, this one uses photoshop to incorporate certain elements onto a different image. the John Cena clip from earlier does that, as well.

Specify the kind of variation

  • mimicry. it's taking the most explicit features of the founder and applying it to a fresh meme.

memetic features

  • humor. most of these are funny and intended to be funny, what can i say? this one also incorporates an element of whimsicality, since spongebob is a children's cartoon.
  • there's also a weird juxtaposition between SpongeGar - a prehistoric sea-sponge - wearing a top-hat and eyeliner. he's underwater, for god's sake.
  • frozen motion comes into play here too – spongegar looks to be in the middle of lunging in surprise/suspicion, and he's been frozen in that pose and utilized as a meme with his limbs spread out in a defensive position.

Genre

  • reaction photoshop. surprisingly detailed. the emo racoon-eyeliner really sells it.

version 9

Accessed 2/20/2017

Chart the memetic dimensions

Content

  • A picture of a horse in an outdoor clearing, wearing a white veil and satin saddle blanket.
  • another simple pun - this time playing on the audio similarities of “whore” and “horse”, while emphasizing the idea that the horse is the bride.
  • this horse looks like a good horse. This horse wouldn’t cheat on its fiance.

Form

The construction of the artifact. This includes its physical incarnation. Visual design and features. Genre.

  • presents the lyric and the alternate ending in text form, accompanied by an image which illustrates the concept at hand
  • instead of using the image as a substitute for the ending, like the s’more meme, this one just tells the viewer what they’re looking at, and uses an image that represents it

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure. can the horse be called a participant here? We’re gonna go with it. It’s a pretty wide open participation structure otherwise – anyone who likes puns, or this meme, or horses in wedding dresses can enjoy and circulate this meme
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style. funny. Amateur? I guess it depends what you would consider the horse. Obviously someone who owns or works with horses dressed it up, but whether or not that was the meme creator is unknown (and probably unlikely). Not that that would make much difference in the tone of the meme.
  • Communication functions. What kind of information is being communicated? Referential. Conative. Emotive. Code. Poetic. Reflexive.
    • I’d call this one poetic, since the horse and the caption are providing a message all on their own. It is referential as well, since it’s obviously referring back to the song, but it doesn’t actually need the context of the song to be amusing. Though I guess if one doesn’t understand the reference, one isn’t really understanding the meme to be a meme.

Specify the kind of variation

  • this could be an imitation. i don't think the horse was specifically dressed in bridal regalia for the purpose of mimicking this meme, but it's certainly putting the horse in the position as the imitator.

memetic features

  • simplicity - it's straightforward. text and an image. it's the strangeness of the image that makes the meme memorable, but it's a very simplistic approach to the meme, at any rate.
  • humor - the horse is dressed as a bride and that is unexpected and amusing. you don't see a horse in a bridal veil every day.

Genre

  • this almost falls under the category of photo fads. i don't think people were dressing up in wedding dresses in public spheres just for the meme, but this feels like it's kind of in the same vein - dressed up to reenact the founder meme or mimic it at least.

version 10

Chart the memetic dimensions

Content

  • An image of Brendon Urie dressed as the ringleader in the “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” music video as he enters the wedding during the first chorus. The image itself is captioned with the lyrics “Haven't you people ever heard of closing the goddamn door?!” in white, while the whole thing is captioned with the phrase “when your parents leave your room and forget to shut the door”
  • where most of the memes up to this point have presented variations of replacing the word “whore” in the song, this one uses the same song, but only a few seconds later
  • this meme is using the song lyric to present a reaction image for when a door has been left open

Form

The construction of the artifact. This includes its physical incarnation. Visual design and features. Genre.

  • a still from the music video, as a reaction to a scenario presented in text form

Stance: Has three sub-dimensions

  • Participation structure. anyone living at home with their parents, or who relates to the frustration of having a door left open when it was closed
    • Keying. Addresses tone and style. sarcastic, adolescent/amateur. It’s making a statement about a frustration that likely would not otherwise be voiced or only internally understood. It specifically mentions parents, so that indicates it could be adolescent.
    • since the meme contains a somewhat inappropriate phrase, it likely isn’t a sentiment that would be expressed aloud, and therefore reflects an internal state of mind and understanding
  • Communication functions. What kind of information is being communicated? Referential. Conative. Emotive. Code. Poetic. Reflexive.
    • referential. Obviously, it’s referencing the song as a response to the situation of a door being left open.
    • it’s also somewhat emotive, as the response addresses an internal reaction to the presented situation
Variations with other artifacts in the meme
  • uses a different part of the song than most of the other memes
  • it could be classed as a separate meme, but it’s still pretty closely related to the other memes and comes from the same founder

Specify the kind of variation

  • remix. it's taking an image from the founder meme and applying it to a different context scenario. instead of overhearing a secret and reprimanding the loose-tongued party-goers, it's a sentiment being expressed to parents

memetic features

  • frozen motion - it's the capture of Urie standing in an open door that has been chosen to represent this meme
  • this isn't mentioned in shifman at all, but this is touching on a kind of universally expressed sentiment. i think this would fall under the broader humor category. it's a sentiment that's hard to put your finger on but when you see it it feels relatable

Genre

  • reappropriation of context is the only thing I can really think of to define this as a genre. that's probably a broad categorization. but the lyrics haven't been altered, the footage isn't photoshopped – it's just a reaction to a different scenario than that of the context within the founder meme.