"Blogging: Fungible across disciplines"


The Educated Blogger: Using Weblogs to Promote Literacy in the Classroom

51.5% of all blogs are being developed and maintained by ages 13-19 (Henning, 2003).

"This paper hypothesizes that blogs can be an important addition to educational technology initiatives because they promote literacy through storytelling, allow collaborative learning, provide anytime anywhere access, and remain fungible across academic disciplines."

Not only are students able to learn the ins and outs of technology at an early age, but at the same time they are developing their skills of communication.

Communication has changed in so many ways, moving more and more towards a technology enhanced society. Blogs are easy to start and maintain, allowing a "sandbox" for children to practice and develop the voice they may later use in the professional and real world.

Collaboration is easier to initiate on blogs, with students and teachers able to leave comments and refer directly to the piece being critiqued or the information being shared.

Code of Conduct needs to be included in the curriculum. In order for comments and collaboration to be helpful students need to learn how to back up their critiques and voice what does and does not work in a piece of literature. This would promote literacy, because students would need to learn the parts of a story and the process of constructing one in order to leave helpful comments and understand why it is they may not like a particular students piece.

ex. One post from a college writing class got off subject and became a political rant. This had nothing to do with the original assignment.
Political Rant

How does a teacher keep everyone on task?
What will happen to MLA? or other rules for citing sources?

On the other hand it takes away from face to face interaction. Leaving some with a more detached feeling when interacting with one another. The written language is also beginning to change thanks to text messages and abbreviations.

Privacy is another concern for many parents of young children. The same "anywhere-anytime access" that makes the blog so easy to work on school assignments also makes it difficult for parent-teacher regulation.

Code of Conduct, how do you initiate and monitor constructive criticism versus inappropriate and nonconstructive comments. ex. "this sucks!"

contributors: Amanda Bertilson, Jess Bohmbach,Jessica Horn
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