Address
* strategies for naming and renaming topics
* how to reduce the cognitive overhead of creating and renaming nodes, how to turn the naming and renaming of topics to heuristic strategies
* strategies for page navigation: what else does this topic link to?
* Linking and organizing. Every node has to live somewhere, even if it's hidden in the Index function.

Writing on a wik is linked topical writing. Writers have to create topics - named spaces in which to write - which are linked together or otherwise structured, and structured more ways than linear order.

Creating and naming nodes demand cognitive overhead writers don't face on paper. The root of the problem is that writers have to create the node before knowing exactly what's going in it - an empty topic - and without knowing where it will appear on the wiki.
* creating a node creates a title that will also serve as the link; the topic name has to serve dual purpose.
* the topic name may later serve a rhetorical function that the writer didn't envision.
* the topic name has to be readily understood by other writers

Naming topics demands that we know where we're going the moment we start. That's a good place to be but often more wishful than accurate and possibly constraining. In the course of addressing the topic, the we might take an unexpected direction, which will demand, in turn, renaming the node and possibly changing the starting point.
cognitive overhead of naming

Creating and naming topics demand cognitive overhead writers don't face on paper. Linking nodes ditto. It's not that these are Bad Things. But they are new choices writers have to make and new practices to learn.

Naming topics presents a particularly sticky complication because ultimately we want the topic name to serve a rhetorical function that we might not have envisioned when we named the topic.

One powerful feature of wikis is the ease with which writers can create nodes and links: Jam two words together or somehow create an intercap, and you create both a new, named space to write in, already linked into the document, and ready to further link to. But this apparent ease conceals the overhead: writers have to do two things: they have to find a place to put the node, and they have to name the node before writing in it. This suggests that we know where we're going at the moment we start: a good place to be but often more wishful than accurate and possibly constraining. In the course of addressing the topic, the we might take an unexpected direction, which will demand, in turn, renaming the node and possibly changing the starting point.

So too, renaming the topic may force re-writing | reworking the content.

lead to - While writing in a wiki means traditional stages of writing (designed for paper) break down, it's useful to have a sense of what you're doing at moments in the process and how to think about the writing space to help guide and manage that doing.


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