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=== getting started ===
Think back to how you looked at these matters at the beginning of this course.
- Think back to how you thought about blogs and wikis at the beginning of this course Go to the archives of your personal blog and read a few entries, and take note of what you noticed, what you valued and why you valued it.

Since the time when you wrote those entries,
- What's changed about the way you now understand blogs or wikis - and how?
- an example of the change
- What's stayed the same - and why?
- an example of what's stayed the same

How are you spending your time on your projects?
- time spent/week
- how often
- how long
- doing what

=== projects ===
What's going well? What's going better than expected?

What's going not so well? What unexpected problems have you encountered?
- examples of problem
- How have you addressed these unexpected problems?

What are you going to do next?
- If you will change your plans, how?

=== collaborative writing and participation ===
If you're working with others, how is it going? That is
- what are others providing
- what are they not providing
- what complications are you running in to that involve the participation of others?
- how might you address those complications?
- what benefits are you gleaning from working with others?
- what drawbacks?

=== writing spaces ===
Has keeping a blog/writing in a wiki changed your writing habits, and if so how?
- writing habits include when you write, where you write, how you write (drafts, revisions, editing), who you write to (audience imagined and audience addressed), how you read your own writing. Do you write and run? return to it to develop later?
- if so, have any of these changes moved into your writing in other writing spaces?

Has keeping a blog/writing in a wiki twigged you into developing any new writing practices?
- if so, examples

Has keeping a blog/writing in a wiki twigged you into developing any new writing strategies? that is, have you found yourself encountering new ways of addressing the new writing situations, eg: how you respond to others on a collaborative blog, or how to write a critique of a piece of writing posted to a wiki?
- if so, examples

Has keeping a blog/writing in a wiki twigged you into experimenting with any new forms or genres of writing - either traditionally recognized (the sonnet; the aphorism....) or (purportedly) new (the list, the linked essay...)
- if so, examples

Has keeping a blog/writing in a wiki changed your understanding of writing, or your understanding of your self as a language user?
- if so, examples
RedefiningBoundaries

=== realm of usefulness ===
As you see it now, how might you use a blog or wiki to support what kind of writing?
- research / academic writing and publishing
- research notetaking and analysis
- personal notebooks
- general online presence: news, reporting, commentary
- online collaborative projects (wikipedia, etc)
- literary genres (essay, poetry, fiction)
- support
- publishing
- teaching

=== generative questions ===
You're now approaching a level of expertise that allow you to address these questions with some authority. So

- In exactly two sentences, define a blog, distinguishing it from other forms of writing spaces, including a wiki and paper.
- In exactly two sentences, define a wiki, distinguishing it from other forms of writing spaces, including a blog and paper. see WhatIsAWiki
- What do you think you as a language user can do best in a wiki / blog that you can't do in another writing space?
- Just what does the blog / wiki provide that good ol' paper and pencil can't?
- Just what does pencil and paper provide that writing in a blog / wiki can't?
- Just what changes about writing when you write in a blog / wiki?

=== and so ===
- What are you finding you're gaining by keeping a blog / writing in a wiki that you didn't expect?
- What are you finding you loose?

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CategoryExercise
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