Revision history for CourseStatement2016


Revision [15638]

Last edited on 2016-01-08 12:29:04 by MorganAdmin
Deletions:
=== Face to face Class Sessions ===
Please be considerate of others in class both face to face an online. When you're here, you're on task.
- No eating. It's distracting.
- Careful with drinks.
- Silence your phone and no calls out.
- Your in-class use of the computer or your smart phone should supplement and contribute to what we're doing in class. Keep your use of the computer related to class discussion, and be careful not to lose the in-class thread. If you miss something, you're responsible for finding out what you missed.
- Decorum. Be decorous to each other. If someone is talking - me, others - listen. Respond.


Revision [15637]

Edited on 2016-01-08 12:26:44 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- You'll be setting up a blog using a WordPress.com account, and registering for a Twitter account. You would also be well-served by getting a Google account so you can use Google Reader or your own RSS reader to receive RSS feeds. You'll be registering on the wiki for this course, and will I'll add you to the Daybook as an author so you can post there.
Attendance is voluntary. If you're here, you'll probably gain something. If you're here and active, you'll definitely gan something. You'll be able to ask questions and get answers right then and there. You'll be able to talk about an assignment. If you miss the face to face class, you miss whatever we did in class that session. Much of what we're doing will be facilitated online, so it's possible to take part in the class without attending face to face.
When you attend, put the phones on silent, stay part of the whole class discussion, and use your computer to focus on what we're doing in class,
//Presence// - posting regularly, daily, visiting others's weblogs and commenting, tweeting with the #en3177 hashtag - is the online equivalent of attendance. Maintaining a presence signals that you are engaging in the class. **If your presence falls too low, I may ask you to drop the course.**
Deletions:
You'll be setting up a blog using a WordPress.com account, and registering for a Twitter account. You would also be well-served by getting a Google account so you can use Google Reader or your own RSS reader to receive RSS feeds. You'll be registering on the wiki for this course, and will I'll add you to the Daybook as an author so you can post there.
If you're here, you'll gain. If you're not, you won't gain.
- Preparation. It's best to be prepared for each face to face class so you can make the most of our time face to face.
- You are responsible for catching up on anything you missed in a face to face class. Talk to your colleagues, not me. Attending face to face sessions is smart because we'll be addressing stuff that might not be addressed else where - and others in the class can use your expertise.
- //Presence// - posting regularly, daily, visiting others's weblogs and commenting, tweeting with the #en3177 hashtag - is the online equivalent of attendance. Maintaining a presence signals that you are engaging in the class. **If your presence falls too low, I may ask you to drop the course.**


Revision [15636]

Edited on 2016-01-08 06:42:34 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
Your success in this class, in learning, in learning in this class, depends on your regular participation and presence using your collective blogs, the wiki, and Twitter. By //regular// I mean, //daily//, even more than once a day. The way we're working during this course, learning accumulates day-by-day, activity by activity.
Deletions:
(Again, thanks to [[http://ds106.us/2013/01/03/umw-spring-2013-syllabus/ ds106.]]) Your success in this class, in learning, in learning in this class, depends on your regular participation and presence using your collective blogs, the wiki, and Twitter. By //regular// I mean, //daily//, even more than once a day. The way we're working during this course, learning accumulates day-by-day, activity by activity.
And, once again: No complaining that you don't understand a tool or reading before you work with it. You won't until you start using the tool or do some research on the issues.


Revision [15635]

Edited on 2016-01-08 06:37:17 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
- Check in again on Thursday for any updates.
- By Monday midnight, post a weekly summary and reflection on your blog, and post an announcement of that summary, with a link to it, on The Daybook. //Include in your weekly summary links or pointers to your work for that week, and reflect on what you've done for that week. More detailed information on the HeuristicForWeeklySummaries page//. (Here's a guide to writing the weekly summaries.)
Deletions:
- Check in again on Thursday for any updates.
- By Monday midnight, post a weekly summary and reflection on your blog, and post an announcement of that summary, with a link to it, on The Daybook. //Include in your weekly summary links or pointers to your work for that week, and reflect on what you've done for that week. More detailed information on the HeuristicForWeeklySummaries page//.


Revision [15634]

Edited on 2016-01-08 06:32:42 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
- Careful with drinks.
- Your in-class use of the computer or your smart phone should supplement and contribute to what we're doing in class. Keep your use of the computer related to class discussion, and be careful not to lose the in-class thread. If you miss something, you're responsible for finding out what you missed.
In short: Address your materials professionally and graciously. (The most scathing critiques ++can be ++are decorous.). Produce materials (and you will be producing a lot) that others will find useful.
=== The Wiki: Privacy and Sharing===
Deletions:
- Careful with drinks. If you spill, you buy BSU a new keyboard.
- Your in-class use of the computer or your smart phone should supplement and contribute to what we're doing in class. Posting notes to your blog is ok, Goggling to supplement our discussion is ok, back-channeling with Twitter to supplement our discussion is ok, but checking D2L, Facebooking, gaming, shopping, and the like are not ok. Keep your use of the computer related to class discussion, and be careful not to lose the in-class thread. If you miss something, you're responsible for finding out what you missed.
=== Meeting Out of Class ===
When we aren't meeting formally as a class, we will be pretty tightly connected through twitter, the course weblog, the wiki, and social bookmarking. But I'd encourage you to meet f2f informally for this class to
- compare notes
- workshop
- give advice
- give moral support
- have lunch
- [BSU Computing Policies ]
In short: Address materials professionally and graciously. (The most scathing critiques ++can be ++are decorous.). Produce materials (and you will be producing a lot) that others will find useful.
== The Wiki: Privacy and Sharing==


Revision [15633]

Edited on 2016-01-07 11:33:17 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
Here are the criteria I'll use for a final evaluation of your work:
Deletions:
I'll review your work and materials for the following:
== demonstrate technical proficiency by ==
- setting up and maintaining a weblog for the course, and using it for course purposes
- ditto wiki pages
- ditto Twitter
- demonstrate a growing independence in technical matters over the semester
- demonstrate a broadening of media attempted over the semester
== demonstrate knowledge by==
- engaging with the work of others in the class by commenting and responding
- posting regular work with readings and topics on your blog
- engaging (meaning //annotating, sharing, remixing, repurposing//) materials both assigned and what you find
- searching for and engaging other materials
- engaging in a continuing refactoring of ideas during the course
- a developing depth and quality in your reflections over the semester
== demonstrate responsibility and academic integrity by ==
- attending face to face classes and maintaining a presence on line
- submitting materials on time
- informally documenting sources in the manners appropriate for the web. (Linking, obviously, but look at some weblogs and you'll see how it's done.)
- not cheating
That's the evidence I'll look at during the progress of the course. Here are the criteria I'll use for a final evaluation of your work:


Revision [15632]

Edited on 2016-01-07 11:32:12 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
- Other readings, animations, videos, mashups provided by the instructor and participants.
Deletions:
Other readings, animations, videos, mashups provided by the instructor and participants.


Revision [15631]

Edited on 2016-01-07 11:31:23 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
- If you want to buy a paper or Kindle copy, try [[http://www.amazon.com/WordPress-The-Missing-Manual-Manuals/dp/1449309844 Amazon]], or [[http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920021391.do O'Reilly]]. Be sure to get the second edition. You will need MacDonald, //WordPress: The Missing Manual// from the first week of class. Use the pdf download.
Deletions:
- If you want to buy a paper or Kindle copy, try [[http://www.amazon.com/WordPress-The-Missing-Manual-Manuals/dp/1449309844 Amazon]]. [[http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920021391.do O'Reilly]].
You will need MacDonald, //WordPress: The Missing Manual// from the first week of class. Use the pdf download.
-


Revision [15626]

Edited on 2016-01-06 16:53:37 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- [[http://pinboard.in/u:mcmorgan/t:en3177 Morgan's Links on Pinboard for ENGL 3177]]
- [[http://pinboard.in/u:mcmorgan/t:blogging | Morgan's Links on Pinboard for //blogging//]]
You will need MacDonald, //WordPress: The Missing Manual// from the first week of class. Use the pdf download.
Deletions:
- [[http://pinboard.in/u:mcmorgan/t:en3177 Morgan's Links on Pinboard for ENGL 3177]]\
You will need MacDonald, //WordPress: The Missing Manual// from the second day of class.


Revision [15623]

Edited on 2016-01-06 12:56:07 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
>>{{image url="https://farm1.staticflickr.com/738/22949006989_c02a39b938.jpg" width="360" }}
[[https://flic.kr/p/AXVEfi | Vancouver, BC]]== Colophon ==
Deletions:
>>{{image url="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2660/4001815143_1dba1452cb.jpg" width="360" }}
[[https://flic.kr/p/76CmdP | From St Paul's]]== Colophon ==


Revision [15622]

Edited on 2016-01-06 12:11:42 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
- MacDonald, Matthew. //WordPress: The Missing Manual//. [[http://www.it-ebooks.info/book/1086/ PDF]]
Deletions:
- MacDonald, Matthew. //WordPress: The Missing Manual//. [[http://www.it-ebooks.info/book/1086/ Free PDF]]


Revision [15620]

Edited on 2016-01-06 10:51:53 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
=== Attendance and Presence ===
If you're here, you'll gain. If you're not, you won't gain.
- //Presence// - posting regularly, daily, visiting others's weblogs and commenting, tweeting with the #en3177 hashtag - is the online equivalent of attendance. Maintaining a presence signals that you are engaging in the class. **If your presence falls too low, I may ask you to drop the course.**
Deletions:
- //Presence// - posting regularly, daily, visiting others's weblogs and commenting, tweeting with the #en3177 hashtag - is the online equivalent of attendance. Maintaining a presence signals that you are engaging in the class. If your presence falls too low, I may ask you to drop the course.


Revision [15619]

Edited on 2016-01-06 10:30:40 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
(Again, thanks to [[http://ds106.us/2013/01/03/umw-spring-2013-syllabus/ ds106.]]) Your success in this class, in learning, in learning in this class, depends on your regular participation and presence using your collective blogs, the wiki, and Twitter. By //regular// I mean, //daily//, even more than once a day. The way we're working during this course, learning accumulates day-by-day, activity by activity.
You may need to adapt your working habits. Rather than putting in a burst of activity one day week, you'll need to //take time every day// to get things done - posting a draft or initial responses to activities, commenting on the work of others, having a look at what others are doing to get a sense of what you are doing, narrating your own course experience - using your blog and Twitter. Your blog and Twitter are how you support your learning, and how you support each other as a learning community.
=== Criteria for Engagement: substantive, detailed, thorough, thoughtful ===
Deletions:
(Again, thanks to [[http://ds106.us/2013/01/03/umw-spring-2013-syllabus/ ds106.]]) Your success in this class, in learning, in learning in this class, depends on your regular participation and presence using your collective blogs, the wiki, and Twitter. By //regular// I mean, //daily//, even more than once a day. The way we're working during this course, learning accumulates day-by-day, activity by activity. You may need to adapt your working habits. Rather than putting in a burst of activity one day week, you'll need to //take time every day// to get things done - posting a draft or initial responses to activities, commenting on the work of others, having a look at what others are doing to get a sense of what you are doing, narrating your own course experience - using your blog and Twitter. Your blog and Twitter are how you support your learning, and how you support each other as a learning community.
Some advice.
=== Criteria for Engagement: SDTT ===


Revision [15618]

Edited on 2016-01-06 10:27:34 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
Some advice.
- Preparation. It's best to be prepared for each face to face class so you can make the most of our time face to face.
- You are responsible for catching up on anything you missed in a face to face class. Talk to your colleagues, not me. Attending face to face sessions is smart because we'll be addressing stuff that might not be addressed else where - and others in the class can use your expertise.
- //Presence// - posting regularly, daily, visiting others's weblogs and commenting, tweeting with the #en3177 hashtag - is the online equivalent of attendance. Maintaining a presence signals that you are engaging in the class. If your presence falls too low, I may ask you to drop the course.


Revision [15617]

Edited on 2016-01-06 10:25:47 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
Here's a //heuristic// (Just google it) I've adapted from [[http://ds106.us/fall-2012-umw-syllabus/ ds106]] to guide composing your weekly summaries:
I'll evaluate your work by how well it meets the Criteria for Engagement above, and by your weekly summaries. **Your summary must link to your productions or I won't find them and you won't receive credit for them. If they are not linked when I review your work, I won't return to review them later.**
- engaging (meaning //annotating, sharing, remixing, repurposing//) materials both assigned and what you find
- informally documenting sources in the manners appropriate for the web. (Linking, obviously, but look at some weblogs and you'll see how it's done.)
That's the evidence I'll look at during the progress of the course. Here are the criteria I'll use for a final evaluation of your work:
In short, the more challenging the tasks you set for yourself, and the more sophisticated the work you take on, the higher your final grade. These features and criteria emphasize //exploring//, //experimenting//, //developing self-reliance//, as well as traditional academic qualities of //complexity//, //insight//, //tenacity//, and //risk//.
Deletions:
- Rosenberg, Scott. //Say Everything//. New York: Crown Publishers, 2009.
=== Working Method ===
To keep yourself organized and to get the most out of the materials and the course, I'm asking you to structure your work around a pattern I've repurposed from [[http://ple.elg.ca/plenk2010/?page_id=2 Steven Downes]]).
**Aggregate** - Read, view, play with, and read anything else that comes in. Get the materials in order. Find places for them on your weblog or wiki, bookmark them, link to them, place them on your desktop - whatever you do when you gather materials together to work with them.
**Remix/Annotate** - Do something **to** the materials. Comment on readings or videos, tweet about them, annotate and tag them. Discuss them on your blog, post a video comment that allows others to comment in return, create a diagram or map opening up the ideas, post a slide show or presentation on prezi. Find other remixes and comment on those. Tag everything relevent to your work with #en3177. (You should have annotating posted by our class meeting on Mondays.)
**Repurpose** - Do something **with** the materials you read and created. Use them as raw materials for your own work. Build on them, re-work them, work them into your own framework, you're own view ... Create a video, blog post, comic, collage, digram or concept map, research project, survey ... whatever. Make the materials you have aggregated and remixed the center of your creation, "the bricks and mortar you ... use to compose your own thoughts and understanding of the material" (Downes). (This is what else you'll be doing from Wednesday - Sunday, when the next set of activities comes out.)
**Feed forward** - Make your work public. This will happen as you work because you're posting to your blog what you're working on as you work. If you have your blog set with an RSS feed, you're sharing. When you tweet a link to your post, you're sharing.
**Reflect** - Look at what you've done and consider what that doing means, for you, for now. This might be a blog post, video, audio ... For reflection, you repurpose your own work. You do something with the materials //you// have created. This is the position of the weekly summary and reflection due Sunday midnight.
It serves learning best to start with //aggregate// and move towards //repurpose// while //feeding forward// all the time. If you really engage the course, you'll probably find yourself doing some of these activities on the fly - when the opportunity strikes - and others after sitting down and taking some time. You might, for instance, tweet (annotate) while reading an article in Bruns and Jacobs, or while watching //The Daily Show// if something that comes up that has to do with the course. Good. Even better, locate and tweet a link to that episode, and tag it so you can find it later, and so others can include it in their work. You might find yourself blending some of the activities, aggregating and remixing stuff by collecting links to them and annotations on your wiki or your blog. You'll likely find that repurposing may take not the most time but might be the most deliberate, sit-down-and-get-it-done kind of time you spend.
I'll be using this pattern in designing activities, and I'll be using these terms to talk about what we're doing. Adapt it to suit.
Here's a heuristic (Just google it) I've adapted from [[http://ds106.us/fall-2012-umw-syllabus/ ds106]] to guide composing your weekly summaries:
I'll evaluate your work by how well it meets the Criteria for Engagement, and by your weekly summary. Your summary needs to link to your productions or I won't find them and you won't receive credit for them. If they are not linked when I review your work, I won't return to review them later.
- Preparation. It's best to be prepared for each face to face class so you can make the most of our time face to face.
- You are responsible for catching up on anything you missed in a face to face class. Talk to your colleagues, not me. Attending face to face sessions is smart because we'll be addressing stuff that might not be addressed else where - and others in the class can use your expertise.
- //Presence// - posting regularly, daily, visiting others's weblogs and commenting, tweeting with the #en3177 hashtag - is the online equivalent of attendance. Maintaining a presence signals that you are engaging in the class. If your presence falls too low, I may ask you to drop the course.
- using tags to submit and share material with others in the course
- engaging (meaning //annotating, sharing, remixing, repurposing// materials both assigned and what you find
- informally documenting sources in the manners appropriate for the web. Linking, obviously, but look at some weblogs and you'll see how it's done.)
That's the evidence I'll look at during the progress of the course. Here are the criteria I'll use for a final evaluation:
In short, the more challenging the tasks you set for yourself, and the more sophisticated the work you take on, the higher the final grade. These features and criteria emphasize //exploring//, //experimenting//, //developing self-reliance//, as well as traditional academic qualities of //complexity//, //insight//, //tenacity//, and //risk//.
I'll keep regular office hours to look at what we're doing online. Don't be a stranger.


Revision [15584]

Edited on 2016-01-05 07:46:31 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
- MacDonald, Matthew. //WordPress: The Missing Manual//. [[http://www.it-ebooks.info/book/1086/ Free PDF]]
- If you want to buy a paper or Kindle copy, try [[http://www.amazon.com/WordPress-The-Missing-Manual-Manuals/dp/1449309844 Amazon]]. [[http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920021391.do O'Reilly]].
Computer(s).
- Your own is best because you'll need regular access to post daily. A tablet or netbook would be good for on-the-go posting and commenting. A smartphone if you have one.
-
Course websites
- The wiki: http://erhetoric.org/WeblogsAndWikis/ The Daybook weblog: http://erhetoric.org/daybook/. You'll be checking the wiki frequently to get information about weekly assignments, and the Daybook for updates and to see what your colleagues are doing. You can make life easier by subscribing to the appropriate RSS feeds.
Accounts
You'll be setting up a blog using a WordPress.com account, and registering for a Twitter account. You would also be well-served by getting a Google account so you can use Google Reader or your own RSS reader to receive RSS feeds. You'll be registering on the wiki for this course, and will I'll add you to the Daybook as an author so you can post there.
=== Your Weblog as a Workspace and a Node in the Course Community===
This course gives you the opportunity to develop the habit of composing for public consumption on the public platform of the weblog.
You'll be running your own weblog as a //place to work//: a space to collect materials and links, to post your notes, drafts and productions, to comment on the ongoing work of others, and to keep chronological track of your work in the course. For you, this weblog is a workspace or lab or studio - and a place to keep record of the work you've done: What you have looked at, what you thought about it, what you created in response.
This makes your weblog for this course a public space, a changing and evolving space, one that writers and readers adapt to the social purposes, and a space that is one node in the network of this course community. I will ask you to tailor your weblog for this course and for the kind of work we're doing. I will shape the course activities to suit weblog work and publication - things like including images, collecting a blog roll, using tags and categories, and above all links links and more links.
For others in the class and elsewhere, this weblog is where they will come to view, link to, and comment on your work in progress. Other tools in your kit will be [[http://erhetoric.org/WeblogsAndWikis/ this course wiki]] for hypertext work, and Twitter for microblogging. We'll all use these.
So, you can use your existing blog if you wish, but I'll ask you to tailor it for the course, and to post materials for this course to it. If you want to keep your existing blog for another purpose, then set up a new one specifically for this course.
We'll take the first few weeks to get set up and become familiar with some tools we'll all use in common: your weblog, the wiki for this class, Twitter, and RSS feeds. This might be intensive (It's //bootcamp//, not //a walk in the woods//) but you'll have plenty to guide you:
- a text: //The Missing Manual, 2nd ed//)
- the WP site support pages: https://en.support.wordpress.com
- your colleagues
- and time to ask questions and get answers in class sessions.
Expect to do most of this bootcamp work outside of class time. You can work with others in the class, of course, a practice I would recommend. //But you'll need to complete all the tasks I assign during this time to demonstrate that you're ready to proceed in the course//. Read that again, with feeling. //You're not ready to continue the course until you've completed bootcamp.//
**Update for spring 2016**: WP has recently updated its web interface and has released a desktop application. (links). This means that //The Missing Manual, 2nd ed// is not up to date. The //principles// and //functions// that we're working with - templates, profiles, blogrolls, categories, tags - are pretty much the same has they have been, but the procedures for using them have changed. If you run into a problem, use the WP Support site at https://en.support.wordpress.com - and search for support.
Deletions:
- MacDonald, Matthew. //WordPress: The Missing Manual//. Paperback, Kindle, modi, PDF. [[http://www.it-ebooks.info/book/1086/ Free PDF]]
- If you want to buy a paper copy, try [[http://www.amazon.com/WordPress-The-Missing-Manual-Manuals/dp/1449309844 Amazon]]. [[http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920021391.do O'Reilly]]
- Computer(s). Your own is best because you'll need regular access to post daily. A tablet or netbook would be good for on-the-go posting and commenting. A smartphone if you have one.
- Course websites: The wiki: http://erhetoric.org/WeblogsAndWikis/ The Daybook weblog: http://erhetoric.org/daybook/. You'll be checking the wiki frequently to get information about weekly assignments, and the Daybook for updates and to see what your colleagues are doing. You can make life easier by subscribing to the appropriate RSS feeds.
- Accounts. You'll be setting up a blog using a WordPress.com account, and registering for a Twitter account. You would also be well-served by getting a Google account so you can use Google Reader or your own RSS reader to receive RSS feeds. You'll be registering on the wiki for this course, and will I'll add you to the Daybook as an author so you can post there.
Whew.
You'll be running your own weblog as a place to work: a space to collect materials and links, to post your notes, drafts and productions, to comment on the ongoing work of others, and to keep chronological track of your work in the course. For you, this weblog is a workspace or lab or studio - and a place to keep record of the work you've done: What you have looked at, what you thought about it, what you created in response. For others in the class and elsewhere, this weblog is where they will come to view, link to, and comment on your work in progress. Other tools in your kit will be [[http://erhetoric.org/WeblogsAndWikis/ this course wiki]] for hypertext work, and Twitter for microblogging. We'll all use these.
=== Your weblog as a node in the course community ===
This course gives you the opportunity to develop the habit of composing for public consumption on the public platform of the weblog. A weblog can be used as a semi-private journal, can be used as a personal space, but the weblog you're running for this course will be space for working on the projects in this course - a public space, a mutable space, one that writers and readers adapt to the social purposes, one that is one node in the network of this course community. I will ask you to tailor your weblog for this course and for the kind of work we're doing. I will shape the course activities to suit weblog work and publication - things like including images, collecting a blog roll, using tags and categories, and above all links links and more links.
You can use your existing blog if you wish, but I'll ask you to tailor it for the course, and to post materials for this course to it. If you want to keep your existing blog for another purpose, then set up a new one for this course.
We'll take the first two or three of weeks to get set up and become familiar with some tools we'll all use in common: your weblog, the wiki for this class, Twitter, and RSS feeds. This might be intensive (It's //bootcamp//, not //a walk in the woods//) but you'll have a text to guide you (//The Missing Manual, 2nd ed//) and time to ask questions and get answers in class sessions. Expect to do most of this bootcamp work outside of class time. You can work with others in the class, of course, a practice I would recommend. //But you'll need to complete all the tasks I assign during this time to demonstrate that you're ready to proceed in the course//. Read that again, with emphasis. You're not ready to continue the course until you've completed bootcamp.
//Updated for reduced meeting times, spring 2015//


Revision [15583]

Edited on 2016-01-05 07:22:36 by WikiAdmin
Additions:
v. 5.1 Spring 2016
>>{{image url="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2660/4001815143_1dba1452cb.jpg" width="360" }}
- MacDonald, Matthew. //WordPress: The Missing Manual//. Paperback, Kindle, modi, PDF. [[http://www.it-ebooks.info/book/1086/ Free PDF]]
- If you want to buy a paper copy, try [[http://www.amazon.com/WordPress-The-Missing-Manual-Manuals/dp/1449309844 Amazon]]. [[http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920021391.do O'Reilly]]
You will need MacDonald, //WordPress: The Missing Manual// from the second day of class.
We'll be putting together set of curated readings as the course progresses. I'll be adding to this with online materials: readings, videos, audio files, visits to weblogs. You'll also be adding to the materials we look at and consider.
Deletions:
v. 5.0 Spring 2015
Updates for spring 2015.>>{{image url="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2660/4001815143_1dba1452cb.jpg" width="360" }}
- Walker Rettberg, Jill. //Blogging//, 2nd edition. MA: Polity Press, 2014.
- MacDonald, Matthew. //WordPress: The Missing Manual//. Paperback, Kindle, modi, PDF. [[http://www.it-ebooks.info/book/1086/ Free PDF]] [[http://www.amazon.com/WordPress-The-Missing-Manual-Manuals/dp/1449309844 Amazon]]. [[http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920021391.do O'Reilly]]
You will need MacDonald, //WordPress: The Missing Manual// from the second day of class, Rettberg from the end of the second week.
The main text that addresses weblogs is Jill Walker Rettberg, //Blogging//, but I'll be adding to this with online materials: readings, videos, audio files, visits to weblogs. You'll also be adding to the materials we look at and consider.


Revision [15582]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2016-01-05 07:18:13 by WikiAdmin
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