Category

Organization by the similarity of characteristics or relatedness of the items.


Example #1: Wikipedia

Example #2: 2016-2017 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog

Part 2: Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog


Who is this site for?
Who is left out?
What is left out?
What could be added?
Why isn't it there?

Alternate System of Organization: Continuum

Add statistics about each area of study, including number of students in each major, their cumulative GPA, grade level, minor, rating of the program and professors
Who are the ideal users?
What content could be added now that was missing?
What purposes can be addressed that were missing?

Time

Organization by timeline or history, where elements are presented in a sequential step-by-step manner.


Example #1: Wikipedia Articles

Example #2: Apple Pie Recipe

Part 2: Apple Pie Recipe


Who is this site for?
Who is left out?
What is left out?
What could be added?
Why isn't it there?

Alternate System of Organization: Category

The option to chunk the direction list into a picture by picture outline of each step involved
Who are the ideal users?
What content could be added now that was missing?
What purposes can be addressed that were missing?

Location

Organization by spatial or geographic location, most often used for orientation and direction.


Example #1: CVS Store Locator

Organized in order of closest location to the person conducting the search, labeled by numbers (1 closest to current location and on). In addition to the list of locations, a map is visible with correlating numbers depicting which numbered location is where. This is effective because location is most likely the deciding factor in which store location the person will chose.

Example #2: Knee Injury Diagnosis

This site is organized both by location of pain and by how the pain started in an attempt to diagnose specific knee injuries. Location of pain is the most important part of the diagnosis, which is why this is the first variation of organization structure. Since pain can be hard to diagnose using just location, a cause of pain section follows the first. Even though location is the most important aspect to focus on here, cause of pain is important too so it is rightfully included in this knee injury diagnosis page.

Part 2: Knee injury Diagnosis


Who is this site for?
Who is left out?
What is left out?
What could be added?
Why isn't it there?

Alternate System of Organization: Category

Separate pain areas into sections based on how painful/serious the symptoms are
Who are the ideal users?
What content could be added now that was missing?
What purposes can be addressed that were missing?

Alphabetic

Organization based on the initial letter of the names of items.


Example #1: BSU Faculty and Staff Directory

This site is organized in list form, with an alphabetical structure. Above the long list of names is a navigation bar containing each letter of the alphabet that carries you to that section of the long list. This method of organization works well because people interested in this information are more likely to know the faculty's name rather than their office or phone number. With such a long list of names, the navigation bar specifically does a great job of creating an easy, fast user experience.

Example #2: 100 Incredibly Useful and Interesting Web Sites

This page is an additional resource that was provided at the end of a 15+ page blog article about useful and interesting websites. Although there is some form of organization present in the article (seemingly by website function) the article itself is very cluttered with pictures, blurbs, paragraphs and few blank space. There is a navigation bar at the bottom, depicting the 15+ pages, but the navigation bar was not clear enough to see what section each page would bring you to. The additional alphabetical list of all 100 sites (linked) is a great addition that allows interested parties to travel to these websites easily, without having to dig through page after page to see if a specific website is mentioned. Alphabetizing the list makes it easy to find a site you were interested in, but may have forgotten where in the 15+ pages that site/link was mentioned.

Part 2: 100 Useful Sites


Who is this site for?
Who is left out?
What is left out?
- Significant purpose left out- descriptions of the sites, links that bring you to the initial article blurb about that specific site
What could be added?
Why isn't it there?

Alternate System of Organization: Category

Following the initial article structure by sectioning the site links by the nature of their content
Who are the ideal users?
What content could be added now that was missing?
What purposes can be addressed that were missing?

Continuum

Organization by the quantity of a measured variable over a range, such as price, score, size, or weight.

Example #1: Baseball Statistics

Most types of statistics will fall into this category of organization because it allows a multitude of important information to not only be visible but to be able to be compared as well. The baseball statistics on this site offer option to organize the information in almost all of the categories, but the initial statistics shows fall into the continuum structure of organization by being initially ordered by batting average. This is a great method of organization for this content because all of the statistics for each player are measured the same way and are ordered from highest batting average to lowest. This allows the players to be easily compared to one another, by seeing how much of a difference there may be in the list between certain targeted players.

Example #2: Rotten Tomatoes

This movie review website falls into the continuum structure of websites because it displays reviews that are all measured based on the same rating system. It uses percentages along with pictures to show how good or bad a movie was, such as a gold circled tomato for the best rated movies, and a green splatter for the lowest rated movies. This organizational structure is very effective because it highlights one of the most important aspect of a movie you may be considering seeing, how great it was, rather than slightly less concerning aspects like the genre, actors, release date, etc. Since all of the reviewers are using the same set scale to rate the movies, people interested in their reviews can be sure the are fairly accurate, and can get the information they seek in a fast, reliable fashion.

Part 2: Rotten Tomatoes


Who is this site for?
Who is left out?
What is left out?
What could be added?
Why isn't it there?

Alternate System of Organization: Time

An option to order the movies by release date
Who are the ideal users?
What content could be added now that was missing?
What purposes can be addressed that were missing?
There are no comments on this page.
Valid XHTML :: Valid CSS: :: Powered by WikkaWiki