Attempt 1:

It was evening and then I was in time again, hearing my Grandfather’s watch that my Father gave to me. He told me it was the mausoleum of all hope and desire. That it was ironic that a machine designed to measure and manage time would be no more effective for me than it was for my forefathers.
“I give it to you not that you may remember time,

but that you might forget it now and then

for a moment and not spend

all your breath trying to conquer it.”

He taught me that no battle is won – not even fought and that victory is an illusion of thinkers and fools.
*Adapted and altered from Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury.

Attempt 2:

When my father gave me my grandfather’s watch, he taught me these lessons:

• Being obsessed with time can kill hopes and desires
• The clock is not useful to the human experience
• Time should not run my life
• Remember to ignore the clock once in a while
• Don’t waste time trying to manage time

“Because no battle is ever won,” he said. “They are not even fought. The field only reveals to man his own folly and despair, and victory is an illusion of philosophers and fools.”
*Adapted and altered from Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury.

Attempt 3: - No changes to the original text other than deleting parts and changing the spacing/layout.

… I was in time again, hearing the watch. It was Grandfather's …
Father gave it to me he said I give you the mausoleum of all hope and desire
… not that you may remember time,
but that you might forget it now and then for a moment …
Because no battle is ever won
he said. The field only reveals to man his own folly and despair, and victory is an illusion of philosophers and fools.
*Adapted and altered from Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury.


Reflections on the Process

It's an interesting process because it goes against every fiber in my being that believes good literature should be savored the way you let a delicious chocolate melt slowly in your mouth. These short cuts seem brutal and murderous.

Does changing the text change the meaning? Yes, I believe it does. As much as I tried to find simpler words to explain the passage, I felt sad and guilty for stripping away the beauty of the diction and form of the original. I think form is just as important as content and that some things were meant to be taken in slowly.

On the other hand, I really enjoyed this challenge. I had a lot of fun thinking of new ways to make it scannable. The first time I tried the block quote. While I liked how this emphasized the poetic, I wasn't sure it fit the definition of "scannable." In my second attempt, I tried the bullet list; this time I was unsure about how much liberty we were allowed to take when altering the original text. For the third attempt, I tried to keep what I thought was the essential message of the original text and truly make it more scannable. Not sure how I did, but found it really a fun exercise.
There are no comments on this page.
Valid XHTML :: Valid CSS: :: Powered by WikkaWiki