Revision history for EthicsAndBoycottsSK


Revision [2844]

Last edited on 2012-02-28 09:53:38 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
The choices that we make as shoppers are directly linked to the standard of living for people around the world. The only way to know whether or not you are making the right choices is to become educated on the items you find necessary for everyday life: what they are made of, who makes them, where they come from and how they are manufactured. When standing in the grocery aisle, price should not be determining factor. Stop and ask yourself where that chicken or beef came from, you may be surprised at the answer.
Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. Positive buying is when you make a conscious decision and effort to purchase ethical products. Assuming that this definition is accurate (we have no reason not to) Ethical Consumerism put simply is to purchase products that are manufactured under humane conditions. This means that no person or animal was hurt before, during or after the process. If you are a serious ethical consumer, you may practice consumer boycotting.
A boycott is designed to correct an outstanding single wrong. As part of an overall program of awareness-raising or reforms to laws, a boycott is part of moral purchasing. Organized consumer boycotts are focused on change of buying habits that require a longer commitment. On an individual level, positive purchasing will typically lead to consumer boycotting when you decide not to purchase a product based on its manufacturing process.
An interview with a college freshman who practices ethical consumerism can help to broaden your understanding of the ethical consumer and may illustrate how easily you can be an ethical consumer:
Deletions:
The choices that we make as shoppers are directly linked to the standard of living for people around the world. The only way to know whether or not you are making the right choices is to become educated on the items you find necessary for everyday life: what they are made of, who makes them, where they come from and how they are manufactured. When standing in the grocery aisle, price should not be the main determining factor. Stop and ask yourself where that chicken or beef came from, you may be surprised at the answer.
Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. This means that there was no harm or exploitation necessary for the production. Positive buying is when you make a conscious decision and effort to purchase ethical products.
Assuming that this definition is accurate (we have no reason not to) Ethical Consumerism simply means purchasing products that are manufactured under humane conditions. This means that no person or animal was hurt before, during or after the process. If you are a serious ethical consumer, you may practice consumer boycotting.
A boycott is designed to correct an outstanding single wrong. As part of an overall program of awareness-raising or reforms to laws, a boycott is part of moral purchasing.
Organized consumer boycotts are focused on change of buying habits that require a longer commitment.
An interview with a college freshman who practices ethical consumerism can help to broaden your understanding of the ethical consumer:


Revision [2803]

Edited on 2012-02-27 21:15:36 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. This means that there was no harm or exploitation necessary for the production. Positive buying is when you make a conscious decision and effort to purchase ethical products.
Deletions:
Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. This may mean with minimal harm to or exploitation of humans, animals and/or the natural environment. Ethical consumerism is practiced through 'positive buying' in that ethical products are favored, or 'moral boycott', that is negative purchasing and company-based purchasing”.


Revision [2802]

Edited on 2012-02-27 21:11:43 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Ethical Consumerism in College
Sabrina Kaiser
Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. This may mean with minimal harm to or exploitation of humans, animals and/or the natural environment. Ethical consumerism is practiced through 'positive buying' in that ethical products are favored, or 'moral boycott', that is negative purchasing and company-based purchasing”.
A boycott is designed to correct an outstanding single wrong. As part of an overall program of awareness-raising or reforms to laws, a boycott is part of moral purchasing.
Organized consumer boycotts are focused on change of buying habits that require a longer commitment.
An interview with a college freshman who practices ethical consumerism can help to broaden your understanding of the ethical consumer:
Dustin Seiltz
Age: 19
School/ Major: University of Minnesota Twin Cities/ Guitar Performance and Music Therapy
Interests/ Hobbies: Playing music, going to concerts, eating vegan, being drug-free.
SK: How old were you when you became aware of ethical consumerism?
DS: I was around thirteen or fourteen.
SK: What caused you to become aware?
DS: I became a vegetarian for ethical reasons when I was twelve, and around the same time I began to get into punk rock. I think hearing about ethical consumption in the lyrics of some of the bands I was listening to and comparing the logic behind it to my reasons for being a vegetarian eventually led to the decision. I think what really threw it in my face was a petition that I came across online. I don’t remember what it was petitioning for, but I remember not wanting to buy Nike shoes after I read it. I was still pretty uninformed though, and I continued to buy items from other companies that use sweatshops. For a while I gave corporations the benefit of the doubt.
SK: What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
DS: I’m vegan now, and so every time I sit down to eat I choose not to take part in an industry and a practice I disagree with. I don’t shop often, but when I do I usually try to get things second-hand. Most of my clothing I get from stores like Goodwill. Sweatshop slavery is very widespread, even in the United States, and by buying things second-hand I know my money won’t go to support it. Coca-Cola has been connected to the murders of union organizers at bottling and processing plants in South America and elsewhere and the University of Minnesota has a contract with Coca-Cola to sell only Coke products. Since I live on campus and eat in the dorms I pretty much only drink water. The things I do aren’t much, but small things can have an impact.
SK: How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
DS: I’ve become more conservative as I’ve gotten older, and my values have changed with that. I do what I can to make sure I don’t support practices I see as unethical, but in many cases the ones with the most power to create change are the workers themselves. Labor costs in China are rising because workers are demanding better wages. The GDP per capita of China is set to meet that of the United States by 2035. Of course, what’s happening in China is not always the case and should not deter anyone from educating themselves about what their purchases support, but it is certainly a good sign.
SK: What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
DS: I’m thoroughly entrenched in debt from student loans, so I can’t really afford to buy much of anything at all. I haven’t really made any lifestyle changes except to stop drinking soda while I’m here.
SK: Have you ever received criticism for participating in ethical consumerism?
DS: I haven’t received criticism for not buying things new, but there have been times where it was clear that whoever I was with found it inconvenient. People don’t like to think about what their money might be supporting, and so they don’t. I don’t think it occurs to most people to think about it, but some are aware and just choose to ignore it. I’ve definitely received a lot of criticism for my vegetarianism and veganism, but most of it was juvenile insults. It’s tapered off as I’ve gotten older.
Deletions:
=====Draft 2/21=====
College, for most, is a time of freedom and independence. This is your first chance experiencing the proverbial ‘real’ world, as opposed to the fake world of childhood that you have left behind. This is the beginning of your molding phase; this is the time to learn and figure out just who you are and what you stand for.
Living on your own for the first time can be exciting, exhilarating, thrilling and sometimes terrifying. Before it was easy; open the refrigerator or kitchen cabinet and try to find something that you like. Now that you are on your own, you are suddenly forced to make adult decisions you never even knew about. Do you know where the products you are purchasing came from? Do you know where the materials to manufacture them came from? These are decision-making factors that consumers face every day.
Wikipedia defines Ethical Consumerism as “Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. This may mean with minimal harm to or exploitation of humans, animals and/or the natural environment. Ethical consumerism is practiced through 'positive buying' in that ethical products are favored, or 'moral boycott', that is negative purchasing and company-based purchasing”.
Wikipedia defines a boycott as: "A boycott is normally considered a one-time affair designed to correct an outstanding single wrong. When extended for a long period of time, or as part of an overall program of awareness-raising or reforms to laws or regimes, a boycott is part of moral purchasing.
Most organized consumer boycotts today are focused on long-term change of buying habits, and so fit into part of a larger political program, with many techniques that require a longer structural commitment, e.g. reform to commodity markets, or government commitment to moral purchasing. These stretch the meaning of a "boycott".
Interview:
- Name: Dustin Seiltz
- Age: 19
- School/ Major: University of Minnesota Twin Cities/ Guitar Performance and Music Therapy
- Interests/ Hobbies: Playing music, going to concerts, eating vegan, being drug-free.
I was around thirteen or fourteen.
- What caused you to become aware?
I became a vegetarian for ethical reasons when I was twelve, and around the same time I began to get into punk rock. I think hearing about ethical consumption in the lyrics of some of the bands I was listening to and comparing the logic behind it to my reasons for being a vegetarian eventually led to the decision. I think what really threw it in my face was a petition that I came across online. I don’t remember what it was petitioning for, but I remember not wanting to buy Nike shoes after I read it. I was still pretty uninformed though, and I continued to buy items from other companies that use sweatshops. For a while I gave corporations the benefit of the doubt.
- What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
I’m vegan now, and so every time I sit down to eat I choose not to take part in an industry and a practice I disagree with. I don’t shop often, but when I do I usually try to get things second-hand. Most of my clothing I get from stores like Goodwill. Sweatshop slavery is very widespread, even in the United States, and by buying things second-hand I know my money won’t go to support it. Coca-Cola has been connected to the murders of union organizers at bottling and processing plants in South America and elsewhere and the University of Minnesota has a contract with Coca-Cola to sell only Coke products. Since I live on campus and eat in the dorms I pretty much only drink water. The things I do aren’t much, but small things can have an impact.
- How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
I’ve become more conservative as I’ve gotten older, and my values have changed with that. I do what I can to make sure I don’t support practices I see as unethical, but in many cases the ones with the most power to create change are the workers themselves. Labor costs in China are rising because workers are demanding better wages. The GDP per capita of China is set to meet that of the United States by 2035. Of course, what’s happening in China is not always the case and should not deter anyone from educating themselves about what their purchases support, but it is certainly a good sign.
- What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
I’m thoroughly entrenched in debt from student loans, so I can’t really afford to buy much of anything at all. I haven’t really made any lifestyle changes except to stop drinking soda while I’m here.
I haven’t received criticism for not buying things new, but there have been times where it was clear that whoever I was with found it inconvenient. People don’t like to think about what their money might be supporting, and so they don’t. I don’t think it occurs to most people to think about it, but some are aware and just choose to ignore it. I’ve definitely received a lot of criticism for my vegetarianism and veganism, but most of it was juvenile insults. It’s tapered off as I’ve gotten older.


Revision [2801]

Edited on 2012-02-27 20:59:43 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Interview:
I’ve become more conservative as I’ve gotten older, and my values have changed with that. I do what I can to make sure I don’t support practices I see as unethical, but in many cases the ones with the most power to create change are the workers themselves. Labor costs in China are rising because workers are demanding better wages. The GDP per capita of China is set to meet that of the United States by 2035. Of course, what’s happening in China is not always the case and should not deter anyone from educating themselves about what their purchases support, but it is certainly a good sign.
I’m thoroughly entrenched in debt from student loans, so I can’t really afford to buy much of anything at all. I haven’t really made any lifestyle changes except to stop drinking soda while I’m here.
I haven’t received criticism for not buying things new, but there have been times where it was clear that whoever I was with found it inconvenient. People don’t like to think about what their money might be supporting, and so they don’t. I don’t think it occurs to most people to think about it, but some are aware and just choose to ignore it. I’ve definitely received a lot of criticism for my vegetarianism and veganism, but most of it was juvenile insults. It’s tapered off as I’ve gotten older.
Deletions:
To gain some insight from an ethically conscious college freshman first hand we decided to interview the real deal:
- Participation? Decisions?

3. What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
5. I’ve become more conservative as I’ve gotten older, and my values have changed with that. I do what I can to make sure I don’t support practices I see as unethical, but in many cases the ones with the most power to create change are the workers themselves. Labor costs in China are rising because workers are demanding better wages. The GDP per capita of China is set to meet that of the United States by 2035. Of course, what’s happening in China is not always the case and should not deter anyone from educating themselves about what their purchases support, but it is certainly a good sign.
6. I’m thoroughly entrenched in debt from student loans, so I can’t really afford to buy much of anything at all. I haven’t really made any lifestyle changes except to stop drinking soda while I’m here.
7. I haven’t received criticism for not buying things new, but there have been times where it was clear that whoever I was with found it inconvenient. People don’t like to think about what their money might be supporting, and so they don’t. I don’t think it occurs to most people to think about it, but some are aware and just choose to ignore it. I’ve definitely received a lot of criticism for my vegetarianism and veganism, but most of it was juvenile insults. It’s tapered off as I’ve gotten older.
1. Participation? Decisions?
I don’t really know how to answer this one. Could you reword it with more clarification?
- List of values: (ie brands you look for/ avoid and why)


Revision [2800]

Edited on 2012-02-27 20:49:20 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
I was around thirteen or fourteen.
I became a vegetarian for ethical reasons when I was twelve, and around the same time I began to get into punk rock. I think hearing about ethical consumption in the lyrics of some of the bands I was listening to and comparing the logic behind it to my reasons for being a vegetarian eventually led to the decision. I think what really threw it in my face was a petition that I came across online. I don’t remember what it was petitioning for, but I remember not wanting to buy Nike shoes after I read it. I was still pretty uninformed though, and I continued to buy items from other companies that use sweatshops. For a while I gave corporations the benefit of the doubt.
I’m vegan now, and so every time I sit down to eat I choose not to take part in an industry and a practice I disagree with. I don’t shop often, but when I do I usually try to get things second-hand. Most of my clothing I get from stores like Goodwill. Sweatshop slavery is very widespread, even in the United States, and by buying things second-hand I know my money won’t go to support it. Coca-Cola has been connected to the murders of union organizers at bottling and processing plants in South America and elsewhere and the University of Minnesota has a contract with Coca-Cola to sell only Coke products. Since I live on campus and eat in the dorms I pretty much only drink water. The things I do aren’t much, but small things can have an impact.

3. What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
5. I’ve become more conservative as I’ve gotten older, and my values have changed with that. I do what I can to make sure I don’t support practices I see as unethical, but in many cases the ones with the most power to create change are the workers themselves. Labor costs in China are rising because workers are demanding better wages. The GDP per capita of China is set to meet that of the United States by 2035. Of course, what’s happening in China is not always the case and should not deter anyone from educating themselves about what their purchases support, but it is certainly a good sign.
6. I’m thoroughly entrenched in debt from student loans, so I can’t really afford to buy much of anything at all. I haven’t really made any lifestyle changes except to stop drinking soda while I’m here.
7. I haven’t received criticism for not buying things new, but there have been times where it was clear that whoever I was with found it inconvenient. People don’t like to think about what their money might be supporting, and so they don’t. I don’t think it occurs to most people to think about it, but some are aware and just choose to ignore it. I’ve definitely received a lot of criticism for my vegetarianism and veganism, but most of it was juvenile insults. It’s tapered off as I’ve gotten older.
1. Participation? Decisions?
I don’t really know how to answer this one. Could you reword it with more clarification?
- List of values: (ie brands you look for/ avoid and why)
Deletions:
- What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?


Revision [2722]

Edited on 2012-02-21 10:59:05 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
To gain some insight from an ethically conscious college freshman first hand we decided to interview the real deal:
- Name: Dustin Seiltz
- Age: 19
- School/ Major: University of Minnesota Twin Cities/ Guitar Performance and Music Therapy
- Interests/ Hobbies: Playing music, going to concerts, eating vegan, being drug-free.
- What caused you to become aware?
- What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
- What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
- How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
- What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
- Participation? Decisions?
Deletions:
To gain some insight from an ethically conscious college freshman first hand we decided to interview Dustin Seiltz.
Name: Dustin Seiltz
Age: 19
School/ Major: University of Minnesota Twin Cities/ Guitar Performance and Music Therapy
Interests/ Hobbies: Playing music, going to concerts, eating vegan, being drug-free.
How old were you when you became aware of ethical consumerism?
What caused you to become aware?
What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
Have you ever received criticism for participating in ethical consumerism?
Participation? Decisions?
- List of values: (ie brands you look for/ avoid and why)


Revision [2721]

Edited on 2012-02-21 10:53:59 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
To gain some insight from an ethically conscious college freshman first hand we decided to interview Dustin Seiltz.
Name: Dustin Seiltz
Age: 19
School/ Major: University of Minnesota Twin Cities/ Guitar Performance and Music Therapy
Interests/ Hobbies: Playing music, going to concerts, eating vegan, being drug-free.
How old were you when you became aware of ethical consumerism?
What caused you to become aware?
What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
Have you ever received criticism for participating in ethical consumerism?
Participation? Decisions?
- List of values: (ie brands you look for/ avoid and why)


Revision [2710]

Edited on 2012-02-21 10:39:43 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Assuming that this definition is accurate (we have no reason not to) Ethical Consumerism simply means purchasing products that are manufactured under humane conditions. This means that no person or animal was hurt before, during or after the process. If you are a serious ethical consumer, you may practice consumer boycotting.
Wikipedia defines a boycott as: "A boycott is normally considered a one-time affair designed to correct an outstanding single wrong. When extended for a long period of time, or as part of an overall program of awareness-raising or reforms to laws or regimes, a boycott is part of moral purchasing.
Most organized consumer boycotts today are focused on long-term change of buying habits, and so fit into part of a larger political program, with many techniques that require a longer structural commitment, e.g. reform to commodity markets, or government commitment to moral purchasing. These stretch the meaning of a "boycott".
Deletions:
Assuming that this definition is accurate (we have no reason not to) Ethical Consumerism simply means purchasing products that are manufactured under humane conditions. This means that no person or animal was hurt before, during or after the process. If you are a serious ethical consumer, you may practice consumer boycotting.


Revision [2709]

Edited on 2012-02-21 10:33:10 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_Consumer| Ethical Consumer Org (Wikipedia definition)]]


Revision [2708]

Edited on 2012-02-21 10:31:51 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Assuming that this definition is accurate (we have no reason not to) Ethical Consumerism simply means purchasing products that are manufactured under humane conditions. This means that no person or animal was hurt before, during or after the process. If you are a serious ethical consumer, you may practice consumer boycotting.
Deletions:
Assuming that this definition is accurate (we have no reason not to) Ethical Consumerism simply means purchasing products that are manufactured under humane conditions. This means that no person or animal was hurt before, during or after the process.


Revision [2699]

Edited on 2012-02-21 09:51:07 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
=====Draft 2/21=====
College, for most, is a time of freedom and independence. This is your first chance experiencing the proverbial ‘real’ world, as opposed to the fake world of childhood that you have left behind. This is the beginning of your molding phase; this is the time to learn and figure out just who you are and what you stand for.
Living on your own for the first time can be exciting, exhilarating, thrilling and sometimes terrifying. Before it was easy; open the refrigerator or kitchen cabinet and try to find something that you like. Now that you are on your own, you are suddenly forced to make adult decisions you never even knew about. Do you know where the products you are purchasing came from? Do you know where the materials to manufacture them came from? These are decision-making factors that consumers face every day.
The choices that we make as shoppers are directly linked to the standard of living for people around the world. The only way to know whether or not you are making the right choices is to become educated on the items you find necessary for everyday life: what they are made of, who makes them, where they come from and how they are manufactured. When standing in the grocery aisle, price should not be the main determining factor. Stop and ask yourself where that chicken or beef came from, you may be surprised at the answer.
Wikipedia defines Ethical Consumerism as “Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. This may mean with minimal harm to or exploitation of humans, animals and/or the natural environment. Ethical consumerism is practiced through 'positive buying' in that ethical products are favored, or 'moral boycott', that is negative purchasing and company-based purchasing”.
Deletions:
=====Draft=====
Living on your own for the first time can be exciting, exhilarating, thrilling and sometimes terrifying. Before it was easy; open the refrigerator or kitchen cabinet and try to find something that you like. Now that you are on your own, you are suddenly forced to make adult decisions you never even knew about. Do you know where the products you are purchasing came from? Do you know where the materials to manufacture them came from? These are decision-making factors that consumers face every day. The choices that we make as shoppers are directly linked to the standard of life for people around the world. The only way to know whether or not you are making the right choices is to become educated on the items you find necessary for everyday life: what they are made of, who makes them, where they come from and how they are manufactured.
Wikipedia defines Ethical Consumerism as “Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. This may mean with minimal harm to or exploitation of humans, animals and/or the natural environment. Ethical consumerism is practiced through 'positive buying' in that ethical products are favoured, or 'moral boycott', that is negative purchasing and company-based purchasing”.


Revision [2698]

Edited on 2012-02-21 09:41:28 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
=====Draft=====
Living on your own for the first time can be exciting, exhilarating, thrilling and sometimes terrifying. Before it was easy; open the refrigerator or kitchen cabinet and try to find something that you like. Now that you are on your own, you are suddenly forced to make adult decisions you never even knew about. Do you know where the products you are purchasing came from? Do you know where the materials to manufacture them came from? These are decision-making factors that consumers face every day. The choices that we make as shoppers are directly linked to the standard of life for people around the world. The only way to know whether or not you are making the right choices is to become educated on the items you find necessary for everyday life: what they are made of, who makes them, where they come from and how they are manufactured.
Wikipedia defines Ethical Consumerism as “Ethical consumerism is the intentional purchase of products and services that the customer considers to be made ethically. This may mean with minimal harm to or exploitation of humans, animals and/or the natural environment. Ethical consumerism is practiced through 'positive buying' in that ethical products are favoured, or 'moral boycott', that is negative purchasing and company-based purchasing”.
Assuming that this definition is accurate (we have no reason not to) Ethical Consumerism simply means purchasing products that are manufactured under humane conditions. This means that no person or animal was hurt before, during or after the process.


Revision [2668]

Edited on 2012-02-20 23:50:17 by SabrinaKaiser
Deletions:
Ethical Consumerism and Consumer Boycotting in College
Have you ever thought about reading the labels of the products you purchase? This is required by law in every developed country so that consumers are able to research the conditions under which products are manufactured.
Most freshman college students are not yet aware of how our choices as consumers affect the lives of others not only locally, but globally.
The concept is simple:
You target niche is freshman college students who are away from home for the first time. This audience will benefit most from the article because they typically have less ‘real world’ experience than a junior in college might.
Your stance should remain neutral and informative while maintaining a casual tone. If your tone is dull or overly formal, the average college freshman will lose interest as if it were just another textbook.
Research:
1.) Use Google to get definitions for terms and statistics to back the points you are making throughout the article. Also, use current blogs, articles and different social media sites to help form some of your questions.
2.) Make a list of questions that you think your audience would ask. Conduct an interview with a college freshman who is aware of these topics. Try to find someone who participates in ethical purchasing and/or consumer boycotting.
Engage the audience by including the voice of the student you interviewed by incorporating a Q & A section.
This article fits under University Life.


Revision [2667]

Edited on 2012-02-20 23:49:33 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
- How old were you when you became aware of ethical consumerism?
-What caused you to become aware?
-What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
-What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
-How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
-What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
- Have you ever received criticism for participating in ethical consumerism?
- Participation? Decisions?
Deletions:
- 1. How old were you when you became aware of ethical consumerism?
- 2. What caused you to become aware?
- 3. What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
- 4. What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
- 5. How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
- 6. What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
- 7. Have you ever received criticism for participating in ethical consumerism?
- 1. Participation? Decisions?


Revision [2666]

Edited on 2012-02-20 23:47:41 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Bio:
- Name
- Age
- School/ Major
- Interests/ Hobbies
- 1. How old were you when you became aware of ethical consumerism?
- 2. What caused you to become aware?
- 3. What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
- 4. What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
- 5. How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
- 6. What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
- 7. Have you ever received criticism for participating in ethical consumerism?
- 1. Participation? Decisions?
- - List of values: (ie brands you look for/ avoid and why)
Deletions:
Bio on Interviewee:
Name
Age
School/ Major
Interests/ Hobbies
1. How old were you when you became aware of ethical consumerism?
2. What caused you to become aware?
3. What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
4. What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
5. How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
6. What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
7. Have you ever received criticism for participating in ethical consumerism?
8.
1. Participation? Decisions?
- List of values: (ie brands you look for/ avoid and why)


Revision [2665]

Edited on 2012-02-20 23:46:10 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Bio on Interviewee:
Name
Age
School/ Major
Interests/ Hobbies
Ethical Consumerism Stuff:
1. How old were you when you became aware of ethical consumerism?
2. What caused you to become aware?
3. What have you learned since becoming an active participant in the ethical consumer culture?
4. What are some everyday habits you make as an ethical consumer?
5. How have those choices (values) changed (grown) as you have become older?
6. What kind of lifestyle changes have you made since beginning college?
7. Have you ever received criticism for participating in ethical consumerism?
8.
Consumer Boycotting Stuff:
1. Participation? Decisions?
- List of values: (ie brands you look for/ avoid and why)


Revision [2664]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:57:46 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
-
Consumer Boycotting:
- [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boycott|Wikipedia]]
- [[http://www.ethicalconsumer.org/boycotts.aspx|Ethical Consumer]]
- [[http://www.ethicalconsumer.org/boycotts/currentboycottslist.aspx|Ethical Consumer (Active Boycotts)]]


Revision [2663]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:52:25 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
- [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism|Wikipedia]]
- [[http://www.ethicalconsumer.org|Ethical Consumer]]
- [[http://knowmore.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ethical_Consumerism|Knowmore.org]]
Deletions:
- [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism|Wikipedia]]
- [[http://http://www.ethicalconsumer.org|Ethical Consumer]]
- [[http://http://knowmore.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ethical_Consumerism|Knowmore.org]]


Revision [2662]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:51:51 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
- [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism|Wikipedia]]
- [[http://http://www.ethicalconsumer.org|Ethical Consumer]]
- [[http://http://knowmore.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ethical_Consumerism|Knowmore.org]]
- [[http://http://www.policyinnovations.org/ideas/briefings/data/000199|Policy Innovations]]
Deletions:
- [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism| Wikipedia]]
- [[http://http://www.ethicalconsumer.org | Ethical Consumer]]
- [[http://http://knowmore.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ethical_Consumerism| Knowmore.org]]
- [[http://http://www.policyinnovations.org/ideas/briefings/data/000199 | Policy Innovations]]


Revision [2661]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:50:46 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
- [[http://http://www.policyinnovations.org/ideas/briefings/data/000199 | Policy Innovations]]


Revision [2660]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:49:13 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
- [[http://http://knowmore.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ethical_Consumerism| Knowmore.org]]
Deletions:
Definitions:
-


Revision [2659]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:47:30 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Ethical Consumerism:
- [[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism| Wikipedia]]
- [[http://http://www.ethicalconsumer.org | Ethical Consumer]]
-
Deletions:
- Ethical Consumerism:
[[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism| Wikipedia]]
[[http://http://www.ethicalconsumer.org | Ethical Consumer]]


Revision [2658]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:47:00 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
- Ethical Consumerism:
Deletions:
Ethical Consumerism:


Revision [2657]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:46:48 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
[[http://http://www.ethicalconsumer.org | Ethical Consumer]]


Revision [2656]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:45:37 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Ethical Consumerism:
[[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism| Wikipedia]]
Deletions:
[[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism]] - Ethical Consumerism


Revision [2655]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:43:09 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Definitions:
[[http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism]] - Ethical Consumerism


Revision [2654]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:00:51 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Interview Questions:
Google Search Stuff:
Blogs:


Revision [2653]

Edited on 2012-02-20 22:00:03 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
======**Article Research**======
Deletions:
====**Article Research**====


Revision [2652]

Edited on 2012-02-20 21:59:48 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
====**Article Research**====


Revision [2553]

Edited on 2012-02-14 10:08:26 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Ethical Consumerism and Consumer Boycotting in College
Have you ever thought about reading the labels of the products you purchase? This is required by law in every developed country so that consumers are able to research the conditions under which products are manufactured.
Most freshman college students are not yet aware of how our choices as consumers affect the lives of others not only locally, but globally.
The concept is simple:
You target niche is freshman college students who are away from home for the first time. This audience will benefit most from the article because they typically have less ‘real world’ experience than a junior in college might.
Your stance should remain neutral and informative while maintaining a casual tone. If your tone is dull or overly formal, the average college freshman will lose interest as if it were just another textbook.
Research:
1.) Use Google to get definitions for terms and statistics to back the points you are making throughout the article. Also, use current blogs, articles and different social media sites to help form some of your questions.
2.) Make a list of questions that you think your audience would ask. Conduct an interview with a college freshman who is aware of these topics. Try to find someone who participates in ethical purchasing and/or consumer boycotting.
Engage the audience by including the voice of the student you interviewed by incorporating a Q & A section.
This article fits under University Life.


Revision [2527]

Edited on 2012-02-10 06:03:00 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
======Ethical Consumerism and Consumer Boycotting in College======
Deletions:
======Ethical Purchasing and Consumer Boycotting in College======


Revision [2526]

Edited on 2012-02-10 05:50:34 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
- Have you ever thought about reading the labels of the products you purchase? This is required by law in every developed country so that consumers are able to research the conditions under which products are manufactured.
- Most freshman college students are not yet aware of how our choices as consumers affect the lives of others not only locally, but globally.
You **target niche** is__ freshman__ college students who are// away from home for the first time.// This audience will benefit most from the article because they typically have less ‘real world’ experience than a junior in college might.
Your **stance** should remain neutral and informative while maintaining a **casual tone**. If your tone is dull or overly formal, the average college freshman will lose interest as if it were just another textbook.
**This article fits under University Life. **
Deletions:
Have you ever thought about reading the labels of the products you purchase? This is required by law in every developed
country so that consumers are able to research the conditions under which products are manufactured.
Most freshman college students are not yet aware of how our choices as consumers affect the lives of others not only locally, but globally.
===The Target Niche===
Freshman college students who are away from home for the first time. This audience will benefit most from the article because they typically have less ‘real world’ experience than a junior in college might.
Your stance should remain neutral and informative while maintaining a casual tone. If your tone is dull or overly formal, the average college freshman will lose interest as if it were just another textbook.
===This article fits under University Life. ===


Revision [2525]

Edited on 2012-02-10 05:47:08 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
===The Target Niche===
Freshman college students who are away from home for the first time. This audience will benefit most from the article because they typically have less ‘real world’ experience than a junior in college might.
===Research:===
**Engage** the audience by including the voice of the student you interviewed by incorporating a Q & A section.
===This article fits under University Life. ===
Deletions:
===The target niche===: freshman college students who are away from home for the first time. This audience will benefit most from the article because they typically have less ‘real world’ experience than a junior in college might.
Research:
Engage the audience by including the voice of the student you interviewed by incorporating a Q & A section.
This article fits under University Life.


Revision [2524]

Edited on 2012-02-10 05:45:15 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
======Ethical Purchasing and Consumer Boycotting in College======
===The target niche===: freshman college students who are away from home for the first time. This audience will benefit most from the article because they typically have less ‘real world’ experience than a junior in college might.
Deletions:
===Ethical Purchasing and Consumer Boycotting in College===
The target niche: freshman college students who are away from home for the first time. This audience will benefit most from the article because they typically have less ‘real world’ experience than a junior in college might.


Revision [2523]

Edited on 2012-02-10 05:44:00 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
===Ethical Purchasing and Consumer Boycotting in College===
Deletions:
Ethical Purchasing and Consumer Boycotting in College


Revision [2522]

Edited on 2012-02-10 05:43:39 by SabrinaKaiser
Additions:
Most freshman college students are not yet aware of how our choices as consumers affect the lives of others not only locally, but globally.
-Make a list of questions that you think your audience would ask. Conduct an interview with a college freshman who is aware of these topics. Try to find someone who participates in ethical purchasing and/or consumer boycotting.
Deletions:
Most college students are not aware of how their choices as consumers affect the lives of others, not just locally, but globally.
-Make a list of questions that you think your audience may want answered. Conduct an interview with a college freshman who is aware of these topics. Try to find someone who participates in ethical purchasing and/or consumer boycotting.


Revision [2521]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2012-02-09 09:28:28 by SabrinaKaiser
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