Revision history for AssassinsCreed3Review


Revision [4014]

Last edited on 2013-02-12 06:51:45 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
[Ready to move to TIO. needs formatting and significant sentence-level editing. Get the formatting started. We'll go over the sentence-level work. mcm]


Revision [3957]

Edited on 2013-02-05 11:19:17 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Assassin's Creed 3 Review
[TLDR] -Link to bottom of page
Worry #1: The game was being released October 31, 2012. Assassin's Creed Revelations had just been released November 29th, 2011. A year was in no way adequate enough time to allow a deep, thoughtful plot.
Gameplay: You start with exactly the same skills at the beginning of the game that you end with at the very end of the game. There is no new knowledge you come across, no interestingly and more deadly techniques. Different weapons from previous games include a tomahawk and a bow and arrow which, I guess, were Ubisofts half-assed attempts at making Connor's heritage more pronounced.
Chases. It felt like 9/10 times the big climatic moment was having to chase after some jackoff that appeared to tease you by slowing down just long enough to let you catch up before sprinting off on a tiresome 3-4 minute chase ending with an automatic cutoff which led to a very tiring and tedious death speech that you had seemed to already hear from the last ten guys you had just assassinated.
Wildlife was hugely boasted from Ubisoft. It can be interesting to sit in a tree observing a pack of wolves take down a deer, or laughing at two moose seemingly caught in a never ending head joust. Wild animal attacks consisted of the same "a", "x", "y", "b" button smashing to override the attack and put the creature out of its misery. First time it was startling indeed. After about six dozen of these attacks you begin to feel badly for the stupid AI Timberwolves that won’t stop attacking you.
Sound/Voice Acting: Assassin's Creed hasn't really been known for epic orchestras or soundtracks, but the voice acting has always been anywhere from good to great. Even when our characters obviously spoke another language, but for our benefit, spoke in English they had an accent that was appropriate to their region. Ezio would occasionally rattle off in Italian with a few cuss words or, more often, lay his assassinated target down with a few gentle words in Italian. These little moments helped the story, not hindered it. If subtitles were on you would be given the translation, feel a little heart flutter and move on.
In Assassin's Creed III there are entire scenes (5+ minutes) where Connor speaks in Iroquois. Like, a lot.
In these games even the side-characters had decent voice acting. In this game, almost half of the characters are unconvincing. It was almost like even the side characters didn't even want to be there. Glitches in audio were also common. At one point you ride along with Paul Revere (the famous 'the British are coming') and this insane babbling moron is pointing to his right while screaming "GO LEFT, GO LEFT!" Consistently.
The only real convincing character was Hathway. He is somewhat an evil genius and also Connor's father. His allegiance is often confusing and misleading, but it works. You can't decide if you want to hate him or like him. The calm, collective smooth tones of his voice acting made his character compelling, real.
The Apple talks to Connor, tells him he is from a long line of Assassin's and that it is his job to help a "future descendant" (Desmond) save humanity.
Connor, for some reason, witnesses the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Almost like Ubisoft was like, "Oh, yeah, that was important right? Let's make Connor walk in at the very end of it and have Ben Franklin loudly announce exactly what it is they're signing for no real apparent reason."
Eventually more crap ensues and you are given all the elements to open the tomb, awaken this powerful force and stop the end of the world on December 21, 2012 (yes, December 21, 2012).
Here Desmond is confronted by two ancient beings who (from my gathering of this confusing plot) were a race of god-like humans that at one point had kept humans as their little play things/slaves. Having destroyed themselves with their own power and greed they eventually set off a series of events that would lead to the destruction of earth. The order of Assassin's were created to keep the Apple of Eden safe and allow time for others to figure out how to fix this mess. The Templars on the other hand, had been searching for the Apple of Eden to use it and control mankind--for them, control is equal to order, and order creates peace. Assassin's believe in free will. Got all of that?
But, "Oh, no no!" Ubisoft cries while laughing. "You don't get to have a choice!
Instead Desmond automatically refuses the second option and agrees to sacrifice his own life to release Juno so that she may rule over humanity with an iron fist. This wouldn't be entirely appalling if not for this one simple fact: You have been playing as an Assassin this entire series, reinforced at every turn that humans deserve their own free will and the chance to guide their own actions. Desmond, instead, completely disregards this entire foundation of this game and simultaneously gives you a big middle finger.
Save your money. Don't bother with this game. It ruins the entire franchise by not giving the game the tender care it deserves.
The Multiplayer is an improvement from Revelations. It can be fun if everyone is playing the game properly, but loses its appeal the second you get a lobby full of morons that would rather sprint around (forcing everyone else to follow suit to assassinate them for points) and ruining the entire point of a "stealth game".
The naval part of this game was actually amazingly fun. Being the captain of your own ship, steering through reefs and sinking other ships proved to be the most exciting and well-thought out part of this game.
Deletions:
Assassin's Creed III Review
Worry #1: The game was being released October 31, 2012. Assassin's Creed Revelations had just been released November 29th, 2011. A year was in no way adequate enough time to allow a very deep, thoughtful plot filled with rich evoking characters and a beautifully constructed world for us to explore. (Granted, the AC games had been coming out rather frequently, but with a final installment I hoped some careful consideration would ensue)
My biggest concern: What was going to happen to all my gorgeous European/Middle Eastern buildings that I could scale like a little monkey and stare off into that computer-generated sunset like it couldn't be more beautiful than the sunset outside my own window? What about the overall feeling I got walking down a marketplace in downtown Rome, pickpocketing priests and getting in fist fights with old ladies? And for the love that is all good, what about my courtesans? Those beautifully seductive succubi that would distract guards for me while I snuck into forbidden locations? The characters I had fallen so deeply in love with (I mean you, Ezio), what was their fate?
Gameplay: You start with exactly the same skills at the beginning of the game that you end with at the very end of the game. There is no new knowledge you come across, no interestingly and more deadly techniques. Different weapons from previous games include a tomahawk and a bow and arrow which, I guess, were Ubisofts half-assed attempts at making Connor's heritage more pronounced. I tended to avoid them completely because nothing is better than assassinating with twin hidden blades.
Chases. It felt like 9/10 times the big climatic moment was having to chase after some jackoff that appeared to tease you by slowing down just long enough to let you catch up before sprinting off on a tiresome 3-4 minute chase ending with an automatic cutoff which led to a very tiring and tedious death speech that you had seemed to already hear from the last ten guys you had just assassinated. Not to mention the running button and climb button are exactly the same button and therefore little Connor here decides that it's much more interesting to scale up a saloon ten feet to your right instead of charging down the alley after your target.
Wildlife was hugely boasted from Ubisoft. "Look fury things that you can kill or pet, skin and trade, be attacked by or observe thoughtfully!" It can be interesting to sit in a tree observing a pack of wolves take down a deer, or laughing at two moose seemingly caught in a never ending head joust. Wild animal attacks consisted of the same "a", "x", "y", "b" button smashing to override the attack and put the creature out of its misery. First time it was startling indeed. After about six dozen of these attacks you begin to feel badly for the stupid AI Timberwolves that won’t stop attacking you.
Sound: Assassin's Creed hasn't really been known for epic orchestras or soundtracks, but the voice acting has always been anywhere from good to great. Even when our characters obviously spoke another language, but for our benefit, spoke in English they had an accent that was appropriate to their region. Ezio would occasionally rattle off in Italian with a few cuss words or, more often, lay his assassinated target down with a few gentle words in Italian. These little moments helped the story, not hindered it. If subtitles were on you would be given the translation, feel a little heart flutter and move on.
In Assassin's Creed III there are entire scenes (5+ minutes) where Connor (formerly Ratonhnhaké:ton until given a new name by his Master Assassin trainer) speaks in Iroquois. Like, a lot.
In these games even the side-characters had decent voice acting. In this game, almost half of the characters are unconvincing. It was almost like even the side characters didn't even want to be there. Glitches in audio were also common. At one point you ride along with Paul Revere (the famous 'the British are coming') and this insane babbling moron is pointing to his right while screaming "GO LEFT, GO LEFT!"
The only real convincing character was Hathway. He is somewhat an evil genius and Connor's father. His allegiance is often confusing and misleading, but it does work because his character is just so... confusing. You can't decide if you want to hate him or like him. The calm, collective smooth tones of his voice acting made his character compelling, real.
The Apple talks to Connor, tells him he is from a long line of Assassin's and that it is his job to help a "future force" (our Desmond who is re-living the memories of Connor now to figure out hints on how to open the vault). Oh, and Hathway is a Templar, not an Assassin like Desmond, or Altair, or Ezio or Connor. So basically Connor is the descendant of either an Assassin gone bad, or Assassin's AND Templars.
And for some illogical reason known to me (and probably even the writers) Connor for some half-assed reason witnesses the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Almost like Ubisoft was like "oh, yeah, that was important right? Let's make Connor walk in at the very end of it and have Ben Franklin loudly announce exactly what it is they're signing for no real apparent reason."
Eventually more crap ensues and you are given all the elements to open the tomb, awaken this powerful force and stop the end of the world on December 21, 2012 (yes, Decemeber 21, 2012).
Here Desmond is confronted by two ancient beings who (from my gathering of this confusing plot) were a race of god-like humans that at one point had kept humans as their little play things/slaves. Having destroyed themselves with their own power and greed they eventually set off a series of events that would lead to the destruction of Earth. The order of Assassin's were created to keep the Apple of Eden safe and allow time for others to figure out how to fix this mess. The Templars on the other hand, had been searching for the Apple of Eden to use it and control mankind--for them, control is equal to order, and order creates peace. Assassin's believe in free will. Got all of that?
But, "oh, no no!" Ubisoft cries while laughing. "You don't get to have a choice, we just wanted you to know that there were two different things that could happen."
Instead Desmond automatically refuses the second option and agrees to sacrifice his own life to release Juno so that she may rule over humanity with an iron fist. This wouldn't be entirely appalling if not for this one simple fact: You have been playing as an Assassin this entire series, reinforced at every turn that humans deserve their own free will and the chance to guide their own actions. Desmond, instead, completely disregards this entire foundation of this game and simultaneously gives a big middle finger to the player gaping at the screen.
Save your money. Don't bother with this game. It ruins the entire franchise with its half-assed thoughtless plot, poor graphics and bad gameplay.
The Multiplayer is an improvement from Revelations. It can be fun if everyone is playing the game properly, but loses its appael the second you get a lobby full of morons that would rather sprint around (forcing everyone else to follow suit to assassinate them for points) and ruining the entire point of a "stealth game".
The naval part of this game was actually amazingly fun. Being the captain of your own ship, steering through coral reefs and sinking other ships proved to be the most exciting and well-thought out part of this game.


Revision [3940]

Edited on 2013-02-05 10:55:00 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
My biggest concern: What was going to happen to all my gorgeous European/Middle Eastern buildings that I could scale like a little monkey and stare off into that computer-generated sunset like it couldn't be more beautiful than the sunset outside my own window? What about the overall feeling I got walking down a marketplace in downtown Rome, pickpocketing priests and getting in fist fights with old ladies? And for the love that is all good, what about my courtesans? Those beautifully seductive succubi that would distract guards for me while I snuck into forbidden locations? The characters I had fallen so deeply in love with (I mean you, Ezio), what was their fate?
Several months after the game came out, I hesitated and I hesitated. Working at a game retail store I saw my far share of ACIII copies returned weeks and even days after being purchased. Most customers reason for return? "I was bored, I couldn't get past the first sequence". Not promising. A fellow co-worker ranted at me for not giving the game a chance. The price dropped twenty bucks. I swallowed my insecurities and bought the game.
Chases. It felt like 9/10 times the big climatic moment was having to chase after some jackoff that appeared to tease you by slowing down just long enough to let you catch up before sprinting off on a tiresome 3-4 minute chase ending with an automatic cutoff which led to a very tiring and tedious death speech that you had seemed to already hear from the last ten guys you had just assassinated. Not to mention the running button and climb button are exactly the same button and therefore little Connor here decides that it's much more interesting to scale up a saloon ten feet to your right instead of charging down the alley after your target.
Wildlife was hugely boasted from Ubisoft. "Look fury things that you can kill or pet, skin and trade, be attacked by or observe thoughtfully!" It can be interesting to sit in a tree observing a pack of wolves take down a deer, or laughing at two moose seemingly caught in a never ending head joust. Wild animal attacks consisted of the same "a", "x", "y", "b" button smashing to override the attack and put the creature out of its misery. First time it was startling indeed. After about six dozen of these attacks you begin to feel badly for the stupid AI Timberwolves that won’t stop attacking you.
Sound: Assassin's Creed hasn't really been known for epic orchestras or soundtracks, but the voice acting has always been anywhere from good to great. Even when our characters obviously spoke another language, but for our benefit, spoke in English they had an accent that was appropriate to their region. Ezio would occasionally rattle off in Italian with a few cuss words or, more often, lay his assassinated target down with a few gentle words in Italian. These little moments helped the story, not hindered it. If subtitles were on you would be given the translation, feel a little heart flutter and move on.
In Assassin's Creed III there are entire scenes (5+ minutes) where Connor (formerly Ratonhnhaké:ton until given a new name by his Master Assassin trainer) speaks in Iroquois. Like, a lot.
Anyone that has watched foreign films and has had to read subtitles will tell you: it is hard to watch the action on the screen while reading the subtitles. The translations are lost with their emotion when it is hard to pinpoint what exactly they're emphasizing and what they're really not. These entire scenes were confusing and, in all honesty, annoying.
The only real convincing character was Hathway. He is somewhat an evil genius and Connor's father. His allegiance is often confusing and misleading, but it does work because his character is just so... confusing. You can't decide if you want to hate him or like him. The calm, collective smooth tones of his voice acting made his character compelling, real.
Connor on the other hand is a very boring, drab, emotionless character. They appeared to try and give him a mysterious, noble air common to Native American chieftains. Often when you read quotes from these mighty leaders or see their startling stoic picture in history books, you get this feeling that this person possessed indescribable amounts of wisdom, spoke carefully and knew a lot more than you ever would. Ubisoft seemed to have attempted this with Connor, but failed miserably. There is no inflection in his voice. Nothing that makes me care, even a little, about what happens to him.
Storyline: Assassin's Creed III begins in England--you are not Connor, but instead, Hathway. Hathway is searching for the location of an ancient tomb that holds the fate of humanity within this vault. You journey as Hathway across the Atlantic, to Boston and begin your journey asking locals about this secret location--eventually finding it--but being unable to open it. Hathway gets the hots for a Native American woman, she gets pregnant and he skips town. A bit later Connor (Ratonhnhaké:ton) is born, you dick around as child Connor for a bit, his Mama dies in a fire, Connor gets mad and blames the British invasion, Connor gets a bit older, you dick around some more, and then SUDDENLY the old lady in Connor's village offers Connor what appears to be the Apple of Eden. Which was, you know, locked in a vault in Italy by Ezio a couple hundred years ago.
The Apple talks to Connor, tells him he is from a long line of Assassin's and that it is his job to help a "future force" (our Desmond who is re-living the memories of Connor now to figure out hints on how to open the vault). Oh, and Hathway is a Templar, not an Assassin like Desmond, or Altair, or Ezio or Connor. So basically Connor is the descendant of either an Assassin gone bad, or Assassin's AND Templars.
The game continues to get more confusing as it goes on. More than half the time you have no idea how Connor happens to stumble across knowledge or why in the hell he seems to have his fingers in every single main battle and event occurring during the American Revolutionary War. I would have been absolutely fine with Connor being a participant or even an observer of this war, but instead, Connor appears to be the REASON it happened and also the reason why the Colonist were even winning. Remember the Battle of Lexington and Concord? Well, thanks to Connor the Colonist's survived and/or pushed back the British. Without Connor (your) tedious help of pressing "a" for fifteen minutes to send cannons or collective fire upon British troops, apparently, history would have been a lot different.
And for some illogical reason known to me (and probably even the writers) Connor for some half-assed reason witnesses the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Almost like Ubisoft was like "oh, yeah, that was important right? Let's make Connor walk in at the very end of it and have Ben Franklin loudly announce exactly what it is they're signing for no real apparent reason."
Here Desmond is confronted by two ancient beings who (from my gathering of this confusing plot) were a race of god-like humans that at one point had kept humans as their little play things/slaves. Having destroyed themselves with their own power and greed they eventually set off a series of events that would lead to the destruction of Earth. The order of Assassin's were created to keep the Apple of Eden safe and allow time for others to figure out how to fix this mess. The Templars on the other hand, had been searching for the Apple of Eden to use it and control mankind--for them, control is equal to order, and order creates peace. Assassin's believe in free will. Got all of that?
We are then told by Minerva (a spirit of these people that has been helping Desmond) that he cannot release Juno (another spirit of these people, apparently) because if he does Juno will take control and rule over them like a God. She will stop the destruction of earth, yes, but they will be controlled slaves for the rest of humanities existence. Just as they were before this ancient race destroyed themselves.
But, "oh, no no!" Ubisoft cries while laughing. "You don't get to have a choice, we just wanted you to know that there were two different things that could happen."
Instead Desmond automatically refuses the second option and agrees to sacrifice his own life to release Juno so that she may rule over humanity with an iron fist. This wouldn't be entirely appalling if not for this one simple fact: You have been playing as an Assassin this entire series, reinforced at every turn that humans deserve their own free will and the chance to guide their own actions. Desmond, instead, completely disregards this entire foundation of this game and simultaneously gives a big middle finger to the player gaping at the screen.
The Multiplayer is an improvement from Revelations. It can be fun if everyone is playing the game properly, but loses its appael the second you get a lobby full of morons that would rather sprint around (forcing everyone else to follow suit to assassinate them for points) and ruining the entire point of a "stealth game".
Deletions:
Insert this Video: http://youtu.be/BVUMPrv8oRw
My biggest concern: What was going to happen to all my gorgeous European/Middle Eastern buildings that I could scale like a little monkey and stare off into that computer-generated sunset like it couldn't be more beautiful than the sunset outside my own window? What about the overall feeling I got walking down a marketplace in downtown Rome, pickpocketing priests and getting in fist fights with old ladies? And for the love that is all good, what about my courtesans? Those beautifully seductive succubi that would distract guards for me while I snuck into forbidden locations? The characters I had fallen so deeply in love with (I mean you, Ezio), what was their fate? Why this obnoxiously huge jump from 1500 to 1700 with nothing in between?
Several months after the game came out, I hesitated and I hesitated. Working at a game retail store I saw my far share of ACIII copies returned weeks and even days after being purchased. Most customers reason for return? "I was bored, I couldn't get past the first sequence". Not promising. A fellow co-worker ranted at me for not giving the game a chance. The price dropped twenty bucks. I swallowed my insequrities and bought the game.
Chases. It felt like 9/10 times the big climatic moment was having to chase after some jackoff that appeared to tease you by slowing down just long enough to let you catch up before sprinting off on a tiresome 3-4 minute chase ending with an automatic cutoff which led to a very tiring and tedious death speech that you had seemed to already hear from the last ten guys you had just assassinated. Not to mention the running button and climb button are exactly the same button and therefore little Connor here decides that it's much more interesting to scale up a saloon ten feet to your right instead of charging down the alley after your target.
Wildlife was hugely boasted from Ubisoft. "Look fury things that you can kill or pet, skin and trade, be attacked by or observe thoughtfully!" It can be interesting to sit in a tree observing a pack of wolves take down a deer, or laughing at two moose seemingly caught in a never ending head joust. Wild animal attacks consisted of the same "a", "x", "y", "b" button smashing to override the attack and put the creature out of its misery. First time it was startling indeed. After about six dozen of these attacks you begin to feel badly for the stupid AI timberwolves that wont stop attacking you.
I'm a gamer that likes blood. AC games typically do not lack this. This one however had the most obnoxiously bad looking blood-on-skin texture I haven't seen since Dragon Age (which is a wonderful game, but the blood in dialogue is just ridiculous). Every character I had to murder along the way to riches or fame, to save the last unicorn or whatever the hell I was doing in this game (it's hard to follow) seemed to have blood droplets in the exact same spot (but in some camera shifts back would be completely gone and then return a scene later).
Sound: Assassin's Creed hasn't really been known for epic orchestras or soundtracks, but the voice acting has always been anywhere from good to great. Even when our characters obviously spoke another language, but for our benefit, spoke in English they had an accent that was appropriate to their region. Ezio would occassionally rattle off in Italian with a few cuss words or, more often, lay his assassinated target down with a few gentle words in Italian. These little moments helped the story, not hindered it. If subtitles were on you would be given the translation, feel a little heart flutter and move on.
In Assassin's Creed III there are entire scenes (5+ minutes) where Connor (formerly Ratonhnhaké:ton until given a new name by his Master Assassin trainer) speaks in Iroquois. Like, a lot. Anyone that has watched foreign films and has had to read subtitles will tell you: it is hard to watch the action on the screen while reading the subtitles. The translations are lost with their emotion when it is hard to pinpoint what exactly they're emphasizing and what they're really not. These entire scenes were confusing and, in all honesty, annoying.
The only real convincing character was Hathway. He is somewhat an evil genius and Connor's father. His alligance is often confusing and misleading, but it does work because his character is just so... confusing. You can't decide if you want to hate him or like him. The calm, collective smooth tones of his voice acting made his character compelling.
Connor on the other hand is a very boring, drab, emotionless character. They appeared to try and give him a mysterious, noble air common to Native American's. Often when you read quotes from these mighty leaders or see their startling stoic picture in history books, you get this feeling that this person possessed indecribable amounts of wisdom, spoke carefully and knew a lot more than you ever would. Ubisoft seemed to have attempted this with Connor, but failed miserably. There is no inflection in his voice. Nothing that makes me care, even a little, about what happens to him.
Storyline: Assassin's Creed III begins in England--you are not Connor, but instead, Hathway. Hathway is searching for the location of an anicent tomb that holds a power untouched by man yet. It holds the fate of humanity within this vault. You journey as Hathway across the Atlantic, to Boston and begin your journey asking locals about this secret location--eventually finding it--but being unable to open it. Hathway gets the hots for a Native American woman, she gets pregnant and he skips town. A bit later Connor (Ratonhnhaké:ton) is born, you dick around as child Connor for a bit, his Mama dies in a fire, Connor gets mad and blames the British invasion, Connor gets a bit older, you dick around some more, and then SUDDENLY the old lady in Connor's village offers Connor what appears to be the Apple of Eden. Which was, you know, locked in a vault in Italy by Ezio a couple hundred years ago.
The Apple talks to Connor, tells him he is from a long line of Assassin's and that it is his job to help a "future force" (our Desmond who is re-living the memories of Connor now to figure out hints on how to open the vault) and help this future descendant find the tomb and all its secrets to save humanity. Oh, and Hathway is a Templar, not an Assassin like Desmond, or Altair, or Ezio or Connor. So basically Connor is the descandant of either an Assassin gone bad, or Assassin's AND Templars.
The game continues to get more confusing as it goes on. More than half the time you have no idea how Connor happens to stumble across knowledge or why in the hell he seems to have his fingers in every single main battle and event occuring during the American Revolutionary War. I would have been absolutely fine with Connor being a participant or even an observer of this war, but instead, Connor appears to be the REASON it happened and also the reason why the Colonist were even winning. Remember the Battle of Lexintong and Concord? Well, thanks to Connor the Colonist's survived and/or pushed back the British. Without Connor (your) tedious help of pressing "a" for fifteen minutes to send cannons or collective fire upon British troops, apparently, history would have been a lot different.
And for some unlogical reason known to me (and probably even the writers) Connor for some half-assed reason witnesses the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Almost like Ubisoft was like "oh, yeah, that was important right? Let's make Connor walk in at the very end of it and have Ben Franklin loudly announce exactly what it is they're signing for no real apparent reason."
Here Desmond is confronted by two ancient beings who (from my gathering of this confusing plot) were a race of god-like humans that at one point had kept humans as their little play things/slaves. Having destroyed themselves with their own power and greed they eventually set off a series of events that would lead to the destruction of Earth. The order of Assassin's were created to keep the Apple of Eden safe and allow time for others to figure out how to fix this mess. The Templars on the other hand, had been searching for the Apple of Eden to use it and control mankind--for them, control is equal to order, and order creates peace. Assassin's believe in free will. Got all of that?
We are then told by Minerva (a spirit of these people that has been helping Desmond) that he cannot release Juno (another spirit of these people, apparently) because if he does Juno will take control and rule over them like Gods. She will stop the destruction of earth, yes, but they will be controlled slaves for the rest of humanities existence. Just as they were before this ancient race destroyed themselves.
But, "oh, oh no!" Ubisoft says while laughing. "You don't get to have a choice, we just wanted you to know that there were two different things that could happen."
Instead Desmond automatically refuses the second option and agrees to sacrifice his own life to release Juno so that she may rule over humanity with an iron fist. This wouldn't be entirely appalling if not for this one simple fact: You have been playing as an Assassin this entire series, reinforced at every turn that humans deserve their own free will and the chance to guide their own actions. Desmond, instead, completely disregards this entire foundation of this game and simutanelously gives a big middle finger to the player gaping at the screen.
The Multiplayer is an improvement from Revelations. It can be fun if everyone is playing the game properly, but loses its appael the second you get a lobby full of morons that would rather sprint around (forcing everyone else to follow suit to assassinate them for points) and ruining the entire point of a "stealth game".


Revision [3931]

Edited on 2013-02-05 10:43:16 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
The Apple talks to Connor, tells him he is from a long line of Assassin's and that it is his job to help a "future force" (our Desmond who is re-living the memories of Connor now to figure out hints on how to open the vault) and help this future descendant find the tomb and all its secrets to save humanity. Oh, and Hathway is a Templar, not an Assassin like Desmond, or Altair, or Ezio or Connor. So basically Connor is the descandant of either an Assassin gone bad, or Assassin's AND Templars.
The game continues to get more confusing as it goes on. More than half the time you have no idea how Connor happens to stumble across knowledge or why in the hell he seems to have his fingers in every single main battle and event occuring during the American Revolutionary War. I would have been absolutely fine with Connor being a participant or even an observer of this war, but instead, Connor appears to be the REASON it happened and also the reason why the Colonist were even winning. Remember the Battle of Lexintong and Concord? Well, thanks to Connor the Colonist's survived and/or pushed back the British. Without Connor (your) tedious help of pressing "a" for fifteen minutes to send cannons or collective fire upon British troops, apparently, history would have been a lot different.
Insert Picture: http://alltheragefaces.com/img/usercreated/4fbd44edb70b6.png
And for some unlogical reason known to me (and probably even the writers) Connor for some half-assed reason witnesses the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Almost like Ubisoft was like "oh, yeah, that was important right? Let's make Connor walk in at the very end of it and have Ben Franklin loudly announce exactly what it is they're signing for no real apparent reason."
The game continues to be ridiculous. At one point you're even a part of the Boston Tea Party, throwing crates of tea into the harbor like some pre-pubescent boy trying to piss off Daddy (Hathway).
Eventually more crap ensues and you are given all the elements to open the tomb, awaken this powerful force and stop the end of the world on December 21, 2012 (yes, Decemeber 21, 2012).
The ending, however, gets more confusing and infuriating.
Here Desmond is confronted by two ancient beings who (from my gathering of this confusing plot) were a race of god-like humans that at one point had kept humans as their little play things/slaves. Having destroyed themselves with their own power and greed they eventually set off a series of events that would lead to the destruction of Earth. The order of Assassin's were created to keep the Apple of Eden safe and allow time for others to figure out how to fix this mess. The Templars on the other hand, had been searching for the Apple of Eden to use it and control mankind--for them, control is equal to order, and order creates peace. Assassin's believe in free will. Got all of that?
We are then told by Minerva (a spirit of these people that has been helping Desmond) that he cannot release Juno (another spirit of these people, apparently) because if he does Juno will take control and rule over them like Gods. She will stop the destruction of earth, yes, but they will be controlled slaves for the rest of humanities existence. Just as they were before this ancient race destroyed themselves.
And then the other option is to not release Juno--allow the world to fall into chaos, solar flares will kill millions--but humans will rise from the ashes, civilize themselves again. You will be remembered as a hero, then a legend, and finally a God. Humans will eventually learn to love one another and then war with one another and eventually end (as Minerva predicts) with a war large enough to destroy them all.
These are the two fates that Minerva offers you. I, for one, was ready to button mash "Option B", be remembered as a God and leave the fate of humanity up to, well, humanity.
But, "oh, oh no!" Ubisoft says while laughing. "You don't get to have a choice, we just wanted you to know that there were two different things that could happen."
Instead Desmond automatically refuses the second option and agrees to sacrifice his own life to release Juno so that she may rule over humanity with an iron fist. This wouldn't be entirely appalling if not for this one simple fact: You have been playing as an Assassin this entire series, reinforced at every turn that humans deserve their own free will and the chance to guide their own actions. Desmond, instead, completely disregards this entire foundation of this game and simutanelously gives a big middle finger to the player gaping at the screen.
This is our end. Desmond is dead, Juno is in power, and humanity is nothing more than slaves now.
Plotline Overall: 2/10
Overall Rating: 5/10.
Save your money. Don't bother with this game. It ruins the entire franchise with its half-assed thoughtless plot, poor graphics and bad gameplay.
Additional Comments:
The Multiplayer is an improvement from Revelations. It can be fun if everyone is playing the game properly, but loses its appael the second you get a lobby full of morons that would rather sprint around (forcing everyone else to follow suit to assassinate them for points) and ruining the entire point of a "stealth game".
The naval part of this game was actually amazingly fun. Being the captain of your own ship, steering through coral reefs and sinking other ships proved to be the most exciting and well-thought out part of this game.


Revision [3919]

Edited on 2013-02-05 10:20:48 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Mild Spoilers to follow
MASSIVE SPOILERS ALERT
Storyline: Assassin's Creed III begins in England--you are not Connor, but instead, Hathway. Hathway is searching for the location of an anicent tomb that holds a power untouched by man yet. It holds the fate of humanity within this vault. You journey as Hathway across the Atlantic, to Boston and begin your journey asking locals about this secret location--eventually finding it--but being unable to open it. Hathway gets the hots for a Native American woman, she gets pregnant and he skips town. A bit later Connor (Ratonhnhaké:ton) is born, you dick around as child Connor for a bit, his Mama dies in a fire, Connor gets mad and blames the British invasion, Connor gets a bit older, you dick around some more, and then SUDDENLY the old lady in Connor's village offers Connor what appears to be the Apple of Eden. Which was, you know, locked in a vault in Italy by Ezio a couple hundred years ago.
Insert Picture: http://www.mememaker.net/static/images/templates/14288.jpg
Deletions:
SPOILERS TO FOLLOW
Storyline:


Revision [3917]

Edited on 2013-02-05 10:15:40 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
SPOILERS TO FOLLOW
Sound: Assassin's Creed hasn't really been known for epic orchestras or soundtracks, but the voice acting has always been anywhere from good to great. Even when our characters obviously spoke another language, but for our benefit, spoke in English they had an accent that was appropriate to their region. Ezio would occassionally rattle off in Italian with a few cuss words or, more often, lay his assassinated target down with a few gentle words in Italian. These little moments helped the story, not hindered it. If subtitles were on you would be given the translation, feel a little heart flutter and move on.
In these games even the side-characters had decent voice acting. In this game, almost half of the characters are unconvincing. It was almost like even the side characters didn't even want to be there. Glitches in audio were also common. At one point you ride along with Paul Revere (the famous 'the British are coming') and this insane babbling moron is pointing to his right while screaming "GO LEFT, GO LEFT!"
The only real convincing character was Hathway. He is somewhat an evil genius and Connor's father. His alligance is often confusing and misleading, but it does work because his character is just so... confusing. You can't decide if you want to hate him or like him. The calm, collective smooth tones of his voice acting made his character compelling.
Connor on the other hand is a very boring, drab, emotionless character. They appeared to try and give him a mysterious, noble air common to Native American's. Often when you read quotes from these mighty leaders or see their startling stoic picture in history books, you get this feeling that this person possessed indecribable amounts of wisdom, spoke carefully and knew a lot more than you ever would. Ubisoft seemed to have attempted this with Connor, but failed miserably. There is no inflection in his voice. Nothing that makes me care, even a little, about what happens to him.
Sound Overall: 6/10
Storyline:
Deletions:
Sound: Assassin's Creed hasn't always been known for epic orchestras or soundtracks, but the voice acting has always been anywhere from good to great. Even when our characters obviously spoke another language, but for our benefit, was spoken in English they had an accent that was appropriate to their region. Ezio would occassionally rattle off in Italian with a few cuss words or, more often, lay his assassinated target down with a few gentle words in Italian. These little moments helped the story, not hindered it. If subtitles were on you would be given the translation, feel a little heart flutter and move on.


Revision [3905]

Edited on 2013-02-05 09:17:44 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Sound: Assassin's Creed hasn't always been known for epic orchestras or soundtracks, but the voice acting has always been anywhere from good to great. Even when our characters obviously spoke another language, but for our benefit, was spoken in English they had an accent that was appropriate to their region. Ezio would occassionally rattle off in Italian with a few cuss words or, more often, lay his assassinated target down with a few gentle words in Italian. These little moments helped the story, not hindered it. If subtitles were on you would be given the translation, feel a little heart flutter and move on.
In Assassin's Creed III there are entire scenes (5+ minutes) where Connor (formerly Ratonhnhaké:ton until given a new name by his Master Assassin trainer) speaks in Iroquois. Like, a lot. Anyone that has watched foreign films and has had to read subtitles will tell you: it is hard to watch the action on the screen while reading the subtitles. The translations are lost with their emotion when it is hard to pinpoint what exactly they're emphasizing and what they're really not. These entire scenes were confusing and, in all honesty, annoying.


Revision [3903]

Edited on 2013-02-03 09:08:50 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
The amount of glitches I had in this game were indescribable. Horses falling through the ground, guards that would not die, items that could not be picked up, guards that could see (apparently) through walls, legs that wouldn't move but instead hover (yes, hover, I was hovering with gimpy legs that dragged sadly across the ground as I moved boxes around like a bobbing ghost pirate, er assassin)... [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_bm8VzTSyg | list goes on.]
Deletions:
The amount of glitches I had in this game were indescribable. Horses falling through the ground, guards that would not die, items that could not be picked up, guards that could see (apparently) through walls, legs that wouldn't move but instead hover (yes, hover, I was hovering with gimpy legs that dragged sadly across the ground as I moved boxes around like a bobbing ghost pirate, er assassin)... the list goes on.


Revision [3902]

Edited on 2013-02-03 08:59:34 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Gameplay overall: 6/10
Graphics overall: 6/10


Revision [3883]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:53:28 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Chases. It felt like 9/10 times the big climatic moment was having to chase after some jackoff that appeared to tease you by slowing down just long enough to let you catch up before sprinting off on a tiresome 3-4 minute chase ending with an automatic cutoff which led to a very tiring and tedious death speech that you had seemed to already hear from the last ten guys you had just assassinated. Not to mention the running button and climb button are exactly the same button and therefore little Connor here decides that it's much more interesting to scale up a saloon ten feet to your right instead of charging down the alley after your target.
I'm a gamer that likes blood. AC games typically do not lack this. This one however had the most obnoxiously bad looking blood-on-skin texture I haven't seen since Dragon Age (which is a wonderful game, but the blood in dialogue is just ridiculous). Every character I had to murder along the way to riches or fame, to save the last unicorn or whatever the hell I was doing in this game (it's hard to follow) seemed to have blood droplets in the exact same spot (but in some camera shifts back would be completely gone and then return a scene later).
Deletions:
Chases. It felt like 9/10 times the big climatic moment was having to chase after some jackoff that appeared to tease you by slowing down just long enough to let you catch up before sprinting off on a tiresome 3-4 minute chase ending with an automatic cutoff which led to a very tiring and tedious death speech that you had seemed to already hear from the last ten guys you had just assassinated. Not the mention the running button and climb button are exactly the same button and therefore little Connor here decides that it's much more interesting to scale up a saloon ten feet to your right instead of charging down the alley after your target.
I'm a gamer that likes blood. AC games typically do not lack this. This one however had the most obnoxiously bad looking blood-on-skin texture I have seen since dragon age (which is a wonderful game, but the blood in dialogue is just ridiculous). Every character I had to murder along the way to riches or fame, to save the last unicorn or whatever the hell I was doing in this game (it's hard to follow) seemed to have blood droplets in the exact same spot (but in some camera shifts back would be completely gone and then return a scene later).


Revision [3882]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:49:09 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Several months after the game came out, I hesitated and I hesitated. Working at a game retail store I saw my far share of ACIII copies returned weeks and even days after being purchased. Most customers reason for return? "I was bored, I couldn't get past the first sequence". Not promising. A fellow co-worker ranted at me for not giving the game a chance. The price dropped twenty bucks. I swallowed my insequrities and bought the game.
Deletions:
playability, game controls, sound, voice acting, graphics and storyline.


Revision [3881]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:39:24 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Insert Picture here --> http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mefhqgqTqP1rbvycjo1_500.jpg


Revision [3880]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:33:30 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
I'm a gamer that likes blood. AC games typically do not lack this. This one however had the most obnoxiously bad looking blood-on-skin texture I have seen since dragon age (which is a wonderful game, but the blood in dialogue is just ridiculous). Every character I had to murder along the way to riches or fame, to save the last unicorn or whatever the hell I was doing in this game (it's hard to follow) seemed to have blood droplets in the exact same spot (but in some camera shifts back would be completely gone and then return a scene later).
Deletions:
I'm a gamer that likes blood. AC games typically do not lack this. This one however had the most obnoxiously bad looking blood-on-skin texture I have seen since dragon age (which is a wonderful game, but the blood in dilaouge is just ridiculous). Every character I had to murder along the way to riches or fame, to save the last unicorn or whatever the hell I was doing in this game (it's hard to follow) seemed to have blood droplets in the exact same spot (but in some camera shifts back would be completely gone and then return a scene later).


Revision [3879]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:32:40 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Graphics: They are terrible at best. Something about the entire look of this game made me feel like a group of tenth graders could have conjured up a nicer game. Everything from the way shadows fall (looking like MS paint had a strong hand in its development) to the way mouths seemed to keep on flapping when no words were being spoken. Snow was a nice touch but the movement across it looked equivalent to someone pushing a tractor. There are no individual footprints or characteristics typical of snow. It felt lazy.
I'm a gamer that likes blood. AC games typically do not lack this. This one however had the most obnoxiously bad looking blood-on-skin texture I have seen since dragon age (which is a wonderful game, but the blood in dilaouge is just ridiculous). Every character I had to murder along the way to riches or fame, to save the last unicorn or whatever the hell I was doing in this game (it's hard to follow) seemed to have blood droplets in the exact same spot (but in some camera shifts back would be completely gone and then return a scene later).
The amount of glitches I had in this game were indescribable. Horses falling through the ground, guards that would not die, items that could not be picked up, guards that could see (apparently) through walls, legs that wouldn't move but instead hover (yes, hover, I was hovering with gimpy legs that dragged sadly across the ground as I moved boxes around like a bobbing ghost pirate, er assassin)... the list goes on.


Revision [3878]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:24:38 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
The Results: Failure. Failure everywhere.
Starting with:
Gameplay: You start with exactly the same skills at the beginning of the game that you end with at the very end of the game. There is no new knowledge you come across, no interestingly and more deadly techniques. Different weapons from previous games include a tomahawk and a bow and arrow which, I guess, were Ubisofts half-assed attempts at making Connor's heritage more pronounced. I tended to avoid them completely because nothing is better than assassinating with twin hidden blades.
Chases. It felt like 9/10 times the big climatic moment was having to chase after some jackoff that appeared to tease you by slowing down just long enough to let you catch up before sprinting off on a tiresome 3-4 minute chase ending with an automatic cutoff which led to a very tiring and tedious death speech that you had seemed to already hear from the last ten guys you had just assassinated. Not the mention the running button and climb button are exactly the same button and therefore little Connor here decides that it's much more interesting to scale up a saloon ten feet to your right instead of charging down the alley after your target.
Wildlife was hugely boasted from Ubisoft. "Look fury things that you can kill or pet, skin and trade, be attacked by or observe thoughtfully!" It can be interesting to sit in a tree observing a pack of wolves take down a deer, or laughing at two moose seemingly caught in a never ending head joust. Wild animal attacks consisted of the same "a", "x", "y", "b" button smashing to override the attack and put the creature out of its misery. First time it was startling indeed. After about six dozen of these attacks you begin to feel badly for the stupid AI timberwolves that wont stop attacking you.
Deletions:
The Results: Failure. Failure everywhere. Starting with:
Gameplay: You start with exactly the same skills at the beginning of the game that you end with at the very end of the game. There is no new knowledge you come across, no interestingly and more deadly techniques.


Revision [3873]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:13:38 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Worry #4: Our new main character would be Connor. The son of a wealthy British man and a Native American woman. Although interesting, how successful would it feel moving from Italy to America from a charming silver-tongued Assassin to a tragic character born out of wedlock between two raging parties? How would they incorporate Connor's heritage and mingle it with the Assassin's?
playability, game controls, sound, voice acting, graphics and storyline.
The Results: Failure. Failure everywhere. Starting with:
Gameplay: You start with exactly the same skills at the beginning of the game that you end with at the very end of the game. There is no new knowledge you come across, no interestingly and more deadly techniques.
Deletions:
The Results:


Revision [3869]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:08:50 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
My biggest concern: What was going to happen to all my gorgeous European/Middle Eastern buildings that I could scale like a little monkey and stare off into that computer-generated sunset like it couldn't be more beautiful than the sunset outside my own window? What about the overall feeling I got walking down a marketplace in downtown Rome, pickpocketing priests and getting in fist fights with old ladies? And for the love that is all good, what about my courtesans? Those beautifully seductive succubi that would distract guards for me while I snuck into forbidden locations? The characters I had fallen so deeply in love with (I mean you, Ezio), what was their fate? Why this obnoxiously huge jump from 1500 to 1700 with nothing in between?
The Results:
Deletions:
My biggest concern: What was going to happen to all my gorgeous European/Middle Eastern buildings that I could scale like a little monkey and stare off into that computer-generated sunset like it couldn't be more beautiful than the sunset outside my own window? What about the overall feeling I got walking down a marketplace in downtown Rome, pickpocketing priests and getting in fist fights with old ladies? And for the love that is all good, what about my courtesans? Those beautifully seductive succubi that would distract guards for me while I snuck into forbidden locations?


Revision [3867]

Edited on 2013-01-31 11:06:38 by YamiBlanford
Additions:
Assassin's Creed III Review
Insert this Video: http://youtu.be/BVUMPrv8oRw


Revision [3866]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2013-01-31 11:04:36 by YamiBlanford
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