(Eric Christenson)
British Novel
A Clockwork Orange Pt1 Discussion Notes
4/19/12

Burgess implements childlike language into Alex's narration with words such as "eggiwegg" and "skolliwoll." According to Esther Petix in "Nadsat, Empathy, and Distance," Burgess uses this to influence the reader to empathize with Alex. "He's still just a kid," so to speak. That's one interpretation, but I read it as Alex using such words sarcastically or ironically. I mean we're talking about a character who says things like "But there were the golosses of millicents telling them to shut it and you could even slooshy the zvook of like someone being tolchocked real horrorshow..." with a straight face.
We are also referred to by Alex as brothers and he refers to himself as such things as "your handsome young narrator." The reader is more or less being talked to by a rapist/murderer as if the two of them are friends. Additionally, Alex is far from a stereotype. His actions are horrible, but he is interesting. He enjoys classical music. He has a love of fashion, of all things- eager to cut someone but loathe to the idea of getting blood on his clothes. He uses very elequent language.
Finally, injustices (or are they?) are committed against Alex. He gets beat up by police, excessively so. He is later deprived of his music. One can argue whether or not he deserves these things, but how does the narrative cast it?



(Eric Christenson)
British Novel
A Clockwork Orange Pt1 Discussion Notes
4/19/12
Burgess implements childlike language into Alex's narration with words such as "eggiwegg" and "skolliwoll." According to Esther Petix in "Nadsat, Empathy, and Distance," Burgess uses this to influence the reader to empathize with Alex. "He's still just a kid," so to speak. That's one interpretation, but I read it as Alex using such words sarcastically or ironically. I mean we're talking about a character who says things like "But there were the golosses of millicents telling them to shut it and you could even slooshy the zvook of like someone being tolchocked real horrorshow..." with a straight face.
We are also referred to by Alex as brothers and he refers to himself as such things as "your handsome young narrator." The reader is more or less being talked to by a rapist/murderer as if the two of them are friends. Additionally, Alex is far from a stereotype. His actions are horrible, but he is interesting. He enjoys classical music. He has a love of fashion, of all things- eager to cut someone but loathe to the idea of getting blood on his clothes. He uses very eloquent language.
Finally, injustices (or are they?) are committed against Alex. He gets beat up by police, excessively so. He is later deprived of his music. One can argue whether or not he deserves these things, but how does the narrative cast it?
-We know Alex is appealing to us, but how convincing is he? Does he succeed in making you feel bad for him, or are his actions too unforgiveable?
-Do you read the childlike language as a mark of Alex's immaturity or clever sarcasm on his part? (Why?)
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