Revision history for TheTexualizedRhetoricalSituation


Revision [17728]

Last edited on 2014-08-28 07:44:25 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
The model below, adapted from Longaker and Walker, is how we're looking at the rhetorical situation. The text itself - a speech, an essay, a webpage - creates or projects an implied rhetor and an implied audience.
Deletions:
The model below is how we're looking at the rhetorical situation. The text itself - a speech, an essay, a webpage - //implies// a rhetor and an intended audience.


Revision [17726]

Edited on 2014-08-28 07:43:02 by MorganAdmin
Additions:
- Associated with the text is//the image of its implied rhetor, the unseen person behind the text that the reader creates//.... The implied rhetor behind the text and the speaker in the text may sometimes be regarded as the same person. That is, the speaker may seem to represent himself or herself, as in King's "Letter." But the speaker may also be a character created by the rhetor, as in Plato's Socrates. The reader typically notices that the text depends on values and beliefs (presup- positions), and the reader also attributes these values and beliefs to the implied rhetor. The text (through the implied rhetor) appears to ask the reader to have certain beliefs, values, and knowledge.
- Outside the text—and outside the bracket in [the figure above]—is the actual rhetor (or the actual writer), the flesh-and-blood person who created the text. //What the reader knows about the actual rhetor will be used to interpret the implied rhetor's intentions.// To put this another way, knowledge about the actual rhetor becomes part of the reader's imaginative construction of the implied rhetor.
However, it also works the other way: We tend to ascribe to the actual rhetor the values of the implied rhetor. Rhetorical analysis cannot actually reach this actual rhetor directly but only by way of mediation, through the rhetorical artifacts they create.
- In some cases the speaker, the implied rhetor, and the actual rhetor appear as more or less the same person.... But in other cases these are different roles. For example, in [a] Volkswagen ad ... the implied rhetor is Volkswagen, while the actual rhetor is the advertising agency that created the ad.
Deletions:
- Associated with the text is the image of its implied rhetor, the unseen person behind the text that the reader creates. (This is commonly re- ferred to in literary criticism as the implied author.) The implied rhetor behind the text and the speaker in the text may sometimes be regarded as the same person. That is, the speaker may seem to represent himself or herself, as in King's "Letter." But the speaker may also be a character created by the rhetor, as in Plato's Socrates. The reader typically notices that the text depends on values and beliefs (presup- positions), and the reader also attributes these values and beliefs to the implied rhetor. The text (through the implied rhetor) appears to ask the reader to have certain beliefs, values, and knowledge.
- Outside the text—and outside the bracket in Figure 2.2—is the actual rhetor (or the actual writer), the flesh-and-blood person who created the text. What the reader knows about the actual rhetor will be used to interpret the implied rhetor's intentions. To put this another way, knowledge about the actual rhetor becomes part of the reader's imaginative construction of the implied rhetor.
- In some cases the speaker, the implied rhetor, and the actual rhetor appear as more or less the same person. Later, in Analysis 1, we discuss Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail." In this document. King (the implied rhetor) is more or less the same as King, the actual writer. But in other cases these are different roles. For example, in the Volkswagen ad we analyze in Analysis 2 the implied rhetor is Volkswagen, while the actual rhetor is the advertising agency that created the ad.


Revision [17702]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2014-08-28 06:13:18 by MorganAdmin
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