PhilPeterson
BethVigoren

Moleskine Marketing Text

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In Moleskine's history/statement piece there are four paragraphs. These paragraphs are made up of 422 words. The first paragraph has 117 words, broken into 3 sentences. The second paragraph has 113 words, broken into 5 sentences. The third paragraph has 79 words, broken into 3 sentences. The fourth paragraph has 113 words, broken into 5 sentences. There is a total of 16 sentences. There are 4 of colons in this piece. There are two colons in the first, with one in the second and one in the third paragraph.

First Paragraph:

1st sentence: declarative, complex, active, loose

2nd sentence: declarative, compound, active?(I am leaning passive, thinking that books are bought by artists.), periodic

3rd sentence: declarative, compound, active, loose

Second Paragraph:

1st sentence: declarative, compound, active, loose

2nd sentence: declarative, compound, active, loose

3rd sentence: declarative, compound/complex? ( I agree not sure which is correct, but I am leaning toward complex, because of the colon and because the second part feels dependent to me on the first part for understanding.), active, periodic

4th sentence: declarative, simple (could the sentence be complex? "where he usually purchased his notebooks" to me seems like a dependent assertion.), passive, periodic

5th sentence: declarative/ (exclamation?) (I think exclamation, "but they were still not enough!), compound, active, loose

Third Paragraph:

1st sentence: declarative, compound, active, loose

2nd sentence: declarative, compound/complex?(I'm leaning towards complex"Following in Chatwin's footsteps" I think is a subordinate clause dependent on the restof the sentence.), active, loose

3rd sentence: declarative, complex, active?(thinking passive same reasoning as before.), periodic

Fourth Paragraph:

1st sentence: declarative, compound/complex?(I vote complex.), active, periodic

2nd sentence: declarative, compound(i am struggling with this sentence it seems complex to me as well, "adapted to various functions" feels dependent to me on the main clause and that it isn't a seperate idea. Thoughts?), active, loose

3rd sentence: declarative, simple/compound?(maybe I have a complex because I think this one is complex as well!), active, loose

4th sentence: declarative, compound(maybe I am having trouble recognizing when an assertion is self standing, what are the self standing assertions that you see?), active?(I think active too.), loose

5th sentence: declarative, complex, active, periodic

We saw that all of the sentences were declarative--pattern?

Reaction and Characterization of Language

The first impression that I got from this insert was a company trying to convey a sense of pomp and grandeur. I know that this approach may impress some consumers, but coming from a college students, that "rich talk" didn't do anything for me. Rather than making me think more of Moleskine, it made me think they were trying to sound better than they really are. Putting an insert in a small notebook doesn't make it The Bible.

I think has a lot to do with language used within all of the declarative sentences. Moleskine wasn't asking or telling you to do anything, rather they were simply stating as to why they are the best. Instead of saying "So why not buy a Moleskine?" they put you into the text. Suddenly YOU are the next Van Gogh or Picasso, because you have a pocketbook that is similar to ones that they used. "...synonymous with culture, imagination, memory, and personal identity..." If you don't have one, forget about all of these important things. The language doesn't have to use a lot of latinate words to sound grand, it just has to make itself seem better than you.

I also find it hard to define what this small piece of folded paper "is." It covers their history, (a little bit,) but that is about it for real information. Everything else is just filling. They are trying to create an exclusive club of people with the same pocketbook. I have a feeling like they think that their customers are proud of their Moleskines--that they are of a higher order. However, I also have the feeling that those people who do have Moleskines are not brand-loyal customers--I say this because of the product itself. It is just a pocketbook--not a really brand-followed product. I can't see their being "Moleskine" people like there are Coke or Pepsi people, Ford or Chevy People. So what is this thing in the Moleskine? The only thing I can see it as is perhaps a security blanket. Although the language is highly grand and qualitative, there is a sense of pride that one gets from reading it. It gives people the sense that the $5 they spent on Moleskine books was a better choice than the $4.75 competitor--Maybe people come back to Moleskine is because of that security blanket factor?

“heir and successor” to describe a notebook?
Definition of heir from dictionary.com a person or group considered as inheriting the tradition, talent, etc., of a predecessor.
Definition of successor a person or group considered as inheriting the tradition, talent, etc., of a predecessor.

Attempting to characterize the diction that Moleskine used. Of course there is the common register that is a large part of the text but there is also archaism being used. The book suggests the idea that using this type of language the rhetor is attempting to persuade the reader that the Moleskine notebook is a part of sacred history.

The second sentence seems to be a periphrasis using many words in the place of notebook.

By using the words “heir and successor,” “trusted” and “handy travel companion” the rhetor is trying to personify the notebook, throughout the piece this tactic is repeated. Even using the word “held” that the notebook itself “held invaluable sketches” is personifying the notebook; I would also label it as a dead metaphor.

Struggling with the schemes.

There is the use of parenthesis in the final paragraph.

The piece contains simple, middle and grand styles. If I had to label it as one style I would say middle, the piece does come off as artificial.

Grandeur would be the qualitative style I think this piece presents of the Moleskine notebook (though I don’t know all of the styles that Hermogenes used).

Accumulation is used in both the first and last paragraph when they describe what the notebook can do for you- its potential.

We think that the piece uses middle language in that, "it appears to be encrusted with artificial unnecessary cosmetic ornament" (162). This is evident in how the Moleskine people describe their product.

Description/Rhetorical Situation

The rhetor for the Moleskine text is most likely the advertising/marketing team--(although our initial reaction was that it sounded like the owner/CEO of Moleskine was writing this stuff.) They want to give the customers a sense of pride and comfort in their product. They are trying to create "Moleskine people." People who feel like they apart of an elite group that feel like they are in someway connected with Van Gogh and Picasso--great thinkers of the world. In this sense, Moleskine's exigence of this text is to create a club for only their customers. The customers exigence for the text is to learn about Moleskine.

The presupposition of this text is that some people do want to feel like their personalities and creativeness should reflect onto their pocketbooks. Like what Group B said, this is clear in the first paragraph, but I think it is also evident in the last paragraph--especially the first sentence.

The last two sentences of the fourth paragraph is interesting in the fact that they are trying to connect their tangible notebook to something greater. (for now.)

Part 2

Deliberative and Epideictic
I view the insert as slightly deliberative because it addresses what will occur in the future with this notebook.
I mostly view it as Epideictic it seems like one big praise for buying the notebook.

Ethos: Moleskine has been around for a long time. They have connections with famous thinkers and movers of the world. reputation, credentials. The famous artists that used the notebooks. But they didn't really use the Moleskine notebooks because that notebook is the "heir and successor" to the notebooks that the artists actually used and isn't it obvious that they used something to write in? (We don't buy this tactic though. Obvious to use that they are just grasping for a connection between the famous people and their notebook--it is not really there.)

Pathos: Moleskine is a reflection of its owners creativity. It gives you a sense of self and personality. the emotion to believe that if you have this notebook you are one step closer to becoming a successful artist.

Logos I want to say that the true arguement is that these noteboos are still valuable today in the technological world. That they haven't lost their importance. "Today, Moleskine is synonymous with culture, imagination, memory, travel, and personal identity - in both the real world and the virtual world."

Figures of Thought and Speech:

Hyperbole-" Chatwin set about buying up all the notebooks that he could find before his departure for Australia, but they were still not enough."- really, he bought all the notebooks and it still wasn't enough?

Allegory-" Moleskine notebooks have resumed their travels, providing an indispensable complement to the new and portable technology of today." the books represent the creative person who holds the same qualities of the notebook. They are both creative, personal, capable of holding multiple ideas at once, and wanting to travel.

Anaphora- Intro "Culture, imagination, memory, travel, personal identity." Fourth Paragraph, "Today, Moleskine is synonymous with culture, imagination, memory, travel, and personal identity..."- repeating the most important/captivating aspects about the notebook.

Climax- First 4 sentences of the last paragraph- "Today, Moleskine is synonymous with culture, imagination, memory, travel, and personal identity - in both the real world and the virtual world. It is a brand that identifies a family of notebooks, journals, diaries, and innovative city guides, adapted to various functions. With the diverse array of page formats, Moleskine notebooks are partners for the creative and imaginative professions of our time. They represent, around the world, a symbol of contemporary nomadism, closely connected with the digital world through a network of websites, blogs, online groups, and virtual archives."--this is what the marketing people at Moleskine really wanted to say. ?However, they couldn't just have this with the risk of being seen as self-indulgent?

Enallage- A simple black rectangle with rounded corners, an elastic page-holder, and an internal expandable pocket: a nameless object with a spare perfection all its own, produced for over a century by a small French bookbinder that supplied the stationery shops of Paris, where the artistic and literary avant-garde of the world browsed and brought them. --not really a sentence. Why did they do this? Probably because it sounded better and they knew no one would care. Creative license.

Hyperbaton--"The notebook was Bruce Chatwin's favorite, and it was he who called it "moleskine"'-- rearrangement of normal sentence structure.

Aporia-"...a nameless object with a spare perfection all its own..." They do have a name for it, Moleskine notebooks.

Periphrasis-"A simple black rectangle with rounded corners, an elastic page-holder, and an internal expandable pocket: a nameless object with a spare perfection all its own"--so much just to describe a notebook.

Parenthesis-"With Moleskine, the age-old gesture of taking notes and doing sketches - typically analogue activities - have found an unexpected forum on the web and in its communities."--the dashes set off another pieces of information that is related to the rest of the text.

Zeguma--"culture, imagination, memory, travel, and personal identity""--yoke these elements to the notebook.

Polyptoton--"Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Ernest Hemingway, and Bruce Chatwin" the same ideal of "artist" repeated via different names.

Patterns

Omission--where are the translations to the French phrases? The buyer of the notebook is missing. The text leads us to believe that its the notebook that does everything.--battery that stores ideas, capturing reality and movement. "you the buyer" is I believe purposefully omitted the notebook takes on its own identity.

Repetition--paragraphs follow 3-5-3-5 sentences, Bruce Chatwin is discussed in the first 3 paragraphs and is the dominant figure in the second paragraph, dead metaphors throughout--based off the notebook itself (By using the words “heir and successor,” “trusted” and “handy travel companion” the rhetor is trying to personify the notebook, throughout the piece this tactic is repeated.
Even using the word “held” that the notebook itself “held invaluable sketches” is personifying the notebook; I would also label it as a dead metaphor. This occurs numerous times in the text where the wording suggests that the notebook itself is doing the work.) tag line- Culture, imagination, memory, travel, peronal identity. the trademark sign after moleskine

Sequence- Starts with early people, goes into early Moleskine, third paragraph is continuing the linage, fourth paragraph is all about today. The timeline of the text is logical. With Moleskine, the age-old gesture of taking notes and doing sketches - typically analogue activities - have found an unexpected forum on the web and in its communities.

Clarity:
Correctness: I don't know any French, but these French phrases in the text lead me to think that this text was correct. To bring in another language, even without a translation, made me think that the Moleskine people were confident in their work to putt it off. I think that it is actually written correctly with what the rhetor is trying to accomplish.--making Moleskine seem like its a great notebook.

Appropriateness: I think that this is an appropriate piece of text for the Moleskine notebook. It is probably unnecessary, but still, the text fits in with this "classy air" that Moleskine has created around their product. Moleskine created the refined nature that people hold for their notebooks. This text further propagates these beliefs. The karios is right as well, in that it is found only after the purchase. It is a reward for the purchase, your ticket to the club. Again I think that the language was carefully chosen and correct to the rhetor's goal.

Distinction: This text definitely has a particular charm to it. It is jammed packed with pomp and grandeur that it makes me think of a person of nobility. Again, this is all created by the Moleskine people. Certain words are very distinct and gave it individuality.

Notes
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