A

The moments we have

As I walked through the busy Denver airport two days ago, I kept noticing kids who were completely in their element.

One young boy was singing like no one was watching. A little girl was dancing her heart out. And group of little girls and boys were skipping around the airport.

I felt their joy, their truth, and their love.

I also noticed a lot of not so joyful adults. An older woman frustrated and yelling about the security line wait. A husband and wife bickering about whether or not the husband was in a good mood. Many blank and smileless faces.

I didn’t feel their joy, their truth, or their love.

Even when the security line is long… is there an interesting stranger we can pick up conversation with? Or, can we take 30 seconds to feel grateful for the trip we are about to take?

How can we, in our every day lives, skip a little more and sing and dance like no one else is watching?

These moments we have, we ought to enjoy them.





B

The moments we have

As I walked through the busy Denver airport two days ago, I kept noticing kids who were completely in their element.

One young boy was singing like no one was watching. A little girl was dancing her heart out. And group of little girls and boys were skipping around the airport--where are their parents?

I felt their joy, their truth, and their love--I also felt the creepy guy in line behind me breathing down my neck.

I noticed a lot of not so joyful adults as well-- understandable since flying during the holidays is like chat roulette. An older woman frustrated and yelling about the security line wait. A husband and wife bickering about whether or not the husband was in a good mood. Many blank and smileless faces.

I didn’t feel their joy, their truth, or their love.

Even when the security line is long… is there an interesting stranger we can pick up conversation with?--i found that the creepy mouth breather was a Vietnam War vet and collected buttons, Or, can we take 30 seconds to feel grateful for the trip we are about to take?

How can we, in our every day lives, skip a little more and sing and dance like no one else is watching?

These moments we have, we ought to enjoy them--and pie, enjoy pie.



The addition of some conversational interaction and snarky comments make this piece apealing to a smaller audience. This also alters the politeness of the piece making it more light hearted, more appealing to cynics and such. Both pieces are objective, but in different ways: one is quite pious and encourages you to be as well and the other is more snarky and meant to make you laugh. The altered piece also contains some expectations of shared knowledge with the mention of chat roulette - this also tightening the sphere of audience members.




CogDogBlog

A

A rather bothersome problem in the ds106 machine of syndication is the loss of web sites when students give up their domains, or just obliterate their blogs after class. It’s a common theme of the distributed web, the stench of link rot – that in our own acts of reorganizing content we manage, that we lose sight that there may be external links into us.

Such links are invisible, silent, you may not even know they are there.

These have been cropping up more frequently in ds106; for the video assignments, I asked my students to review the works of previous students that I (sort of) elegantly syndicate into the Assignment Collection, the ones that appear as Submissions So Far – try the random spinner to take a peek.

And that is a thing with a Domain of your Own- “On”e you can delete or migrate your own stuff or just let go of your main after ds106 is done. We have to try and be okay with that.

Though my own thought, now nearing 29n years of web content created, that when you launch a URL into the web, you should do everything you can to make sure it stays there. You are the web, You make, it, and when You destroy a published URl, well I like to think every time that happens You make Tim Berners-Lee’s cat cry in pain.




B

A rather annoying grain of sand in the ds106 machine of syndication is the loss of web sites when students give up their domains, or just obliterate their blogs after class. It’s a common theme of the distributed web, the stench of link rot – that in our own acts of reorganizing content we manage, that we lose sight that there may be external links into us.

Such links are invisible, silent, we do not even know they are there.

These has been cropping up more frequently in ds106; for our video assignments, we asked students to review the works of previous students that we (sort of) elegantly syndicate into the Assignment Collection, the ones that appear as Submissions So Far – try the random spinner to take a peek.

And that is a thing with a Domain of One’s Own- “On”e can delete or migrate their own stiuff or just let go of their domain after ds106 is done. We have to try and be okay with that.

Though my own thought, now nearing 29n years of web content created, that one you launch a URL into the web, you should do everything you can to make sure it stays there. We are the web, we make, it, and when we destroy a published URl, well I like to think every time that happens we make Tim Berners-Lee’s cat cry in pain.


In the altered piece I took away a few flouts(in turn adding some politeness) and altered the pronoun usage from we to you (making the piece more direct toward one person rather than to a larger group). The removal of the flouts make this piece seem to be a bit more formal, tightening the audience who might be interested in reading a slightly more stuffy piece. By changing the pronouns from we to you the piece was made to seem more personally directed to the specific reader as opposed to a group as a whole; since you means you and we can mean anything from a family of four to the entire royal navy. These alterations made the piece more personable and less like it was catering to a very large group, a more intimate conversation between you (the reader) and the blogger.


Blogs unlike other forms of mass media do not need a large audience in order to function as Meyers says. This is true as most bloggers are only blogging to share their thoughts and interests with other like minded people and could care less if the audience is made up of ten or ten thousand people. So obviously a blogger would be looking for the right audience rather than a large audience, as this "Right" audience would be more conducive to stimulating conversations over the shared topic of interest discussed on a particular blog. The various audience markers help to form this "Right" audience by assuring them that they are indeed in the right place for their interests; this is done through things such as specific address (quite obviously as this often points directly to the intended audience), Use of pronouns which make the reader to feel as if they are a part of the group, Politeness or lack thereof depending on the blogs style (a blog discussing different entities of pop culture would probably be less polite and formal than the blog of an MIT student publishing his work for his colleagues). With this being said Meyers claim is extremely significant and without a doubt true. It is safe to say that the majority of bloggers would rather have an engaged audience over a large half-hearted one as most do not blog for money, but rather to share their interests with other like minded people and wish only to gain relevant perspective, comments, and banter on their topic of choice. This is significant as you notice the role which audience markers play in different types of blogs, for instance a blog I frequent which is widely read and far more corporate which goes by the name of CollegeFashion is far more diverse in their subject matter as they wish to cater to a wider audience as this is what they do for a living. The brands of clothing they talk about are very diverse ranging from american eagle to top shop these are nonetheless very universial brands, household names, making this blog feel accessible to everyone. On the other hand there is a smaller blog i frequent by the name of teacupsandcoture which has a smaller reader base due to its more interest specific content ( the brands and designers are far more obscure (think john galliano and thome brown) ) Many readers are scared off by the notion of haute couture and therefore tend to shy away from blogs such as these where shared knowledge is necessary...leaving this small interest specific blog to the extreme fashion junkies.




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